Bad at Sports Giveaway

November 18, 2008 · Print This Article

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The kind folks at Cinema Libre Studio has hooked us up with two copies of their latest release American Shopper to be given away. Directors Tamas Bojtor and Sybil Dessau’s hybrid documentary follows 8 contestants and the founder of aisling as they prepare for the first ever National Aisling Championship.Throughout the film we dive into the characters motivations and inspirations for aisling as they prepare themselves for the big competition. The highlight of the film is most definitely the Star Trek shopping cart. If you are not one of the lucky two to get a copy, American Shopper is being released today and should be available on Netflix or through Cinema Libre Studio.

So, here is the deal. The first two people to email me (megonli@gmail) with AMERICAN SHOPPER as the subject will win one of two copies plus the new BAS buttons and some stickers.

Thanks again to Beth & Giedre for the hookup.

Clementine Deliss in bootprint and at the Franke Institute

November 17, 2008 · Print This Article

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In the soon to be released issue of bootprint (Vol. 2, Issue 2) Danyel Ferrari interviews Clementine Deliss. Assistant Editor Tim Ridlen sent me an excerpt which coincides with Deliss’ lecture tomorrow, Tuesday, November 18th at 3pm.

The lecture will be held at:

The Franke Institute for the Humanities
The University of Chicago
1100 East 57th Street, JRL S-102
Chicago, Illinois 60637

via bootprint

“Danyel Ferrari: Questions of space and mobility were often discussed as a part of Future Academy. What do you think about the place of architecture in the architecture of ideas, should there be walls?

Clementine Deliss: I might have a different perspective on that than, say, the students I have worked with in Future Academy. For the students I have worked with, this was actually one of the clearest issues and it came up very early on with regard to future buildings. The majority of students, whether they were based in Mumbai, Bangalore, Dakar or Edinburgh generally felt that they didn’t need buildings in the first instance. They sought more face-to-face contact in the sense that they wanted field studies in locations and therefore a kind of plug-in system to enable contact to be played out. So they proposed the “shack academy,” built on existing tea shops, usually roadside venues where more discussions took place than within the walls of the academy buildings. They effectively wanted a more informal location for the production of ideas. The Bangalore group felt that it wouldn’t be advantageous at this stage to invest in a large amount of technology, but safer to wait a while and test out the conditions that might develop over the next few years. So it wasn’t just about buying computers and various technology that would allow for this kind of plug-in mobility, it was something else. What they felt needed to be created was a quasi-business model where information, contacts and networks between these students could be developed into an economic set of relations as they became professionalized and entered into various careers. They wanted to build on the structures that they were already developing through Future Academy and create “roving colleges” that might provide a more equitable framework for them than the type of expansionism that we have known from the colonial period and that is in some cases, though not everywhere, being reformulated today.

Personally, I think one should be more careful and more sensitive to the fact that artists, if they work in the art college context, are actually moving into a back-stage condition. And this back-stage condition is enormously enriching for students. So sure they will teach, they’re always teaching, but they do not need to do courses so much as to be able to mediate what it is they are working on. In an art college, everybody is in a research context and for that purpose they need space. So I would argue that if you invite an artist to work within the art college, as much as possible you need to provide a certain space, a notion of “studio,” rather than creating staff rooms where they all check their emails and then go home. So I’m quite old fashioned in that I favor the artist’s studio within the art school context. And that is something that is either being reduced or is, in some parts of the world, utterly nonexistent.”

Read the full article when the latest issue of bootprint drops in December.

Select Media Festival 7 Begins This Weekend

November 14, 2008 · Print This Article

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via Select Media Festival

“This year’s Select Media Festival has the theme of INFOPORN and features works by scientists, designers and artists from around the planet.

Come down this weekend. Friday and Saturday and Sunday all at the Co-Pro in Bridgeport and see a show that is dear to our hearts..

Visit the website: http://selectmediafestival.org and make sure you don’t miss the action…

Or read below for to see the three days of the program ::

Friday November 14, 2008 8pm
Co-Prosperity Sphere • 3219 S Morgan St (MAP)

Infoporn Opening Night
We open up the festival with the group exhibition, Infoporn. The exhibition explores the art of information design by artists from around the world. It is curated by Gregory Calvert and Ed Marszewski. The opening night of the fesitval also features performances from Chicago ex-pats, Eric Fensler and TRS-80.

Featuring the work of

Catalog Tree
Univerite Tangente
Eric Fensler
Jonathan Harris
An Atlas of Radical Geography*
Dave Bowker
Nicholas Felton
Edward Marcotte & Alex Adai
Stephanie Posavec
Logan Bay
Yunchul Kim
Aaron Koblin
Jean Livet
John Duda
Jude M.C.
Ryan Scheidt
Lumpen (The Subjective Atlas of Bridgeport DWNLD it now)
Jonathan Petersen
Alison Haigh
Benjamin June
Peter Skvara
Gregory Calvert
Logan Bay

The show runs through December 5, 2008. Hours are during festival hours and by appointment.”

For more information please visit Select Media Festival’s site.

Amanda Ross Ho Speaking Tonight at DePaul

November 13, 2008 · Print This Article

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Tonight, November 13th at 6:00 pm Amanda Ross Ho will be lecturing at Depaul’s Art Museum. It is located at 2350 N. Kenmore Ave.

For more info please visit their website.

Add-Art & AFC

November 10, 2008 · Print This Article

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Jessica Slaven’s untitled exhibition via Art Fag City

Last night as I was readying myself to listen to this weeks podcast (I heart Paddy Johnson) I was trolling Art Fag City to see what I might have missed while being distracted by my day job. What I found was Jonson’s curated online show with Add-Art titled The Future of Online Advertising. Add-Art (developed by Eyebeam) replaces the advertisements found on websites with art from a database that is curated regularly. Unfortunately, I had a few problems. Instead of seeing art my advertisements were blacked out (which was still nice) and it made Firefox crash. Especially when i was visiting the BAS website. It seems though that these problems have been fixed so I will give it another shot.

A little bit about this show via Add Art

“The Future of Online Advertising, a group exhibition featuring the work of Ben Coonley, Jason Corace, Charles Gute, Brian Kennon, Elke Lehmann, Jessica Slaven, Maya Schindler, and Sheila Wilson appropriates a familiar turn of phrase in the same way the participating artists in this show draw upon pre-existing cultural material. Taken from the similarly named annual New York online advertising conference, the title means to broadly describe a utopic form of advertising; which is to say, in the future, all advertising is art. It is aesthetically challenging and engaging, it is inventive and it is smart.” Read the rest of the statement here.

If you are interested in trying it out for yourself download it here