Some More MOCA Updates

December 19, 2008 · Print This Article

Photobucket

We all saw this coming: Jeremy Strick to resign…or not?
“One member of the museum’s Board of Trustees, speaking on condition of anonymity, said Strick had resigned during a ‘tearful’ scene at a meeting of the board. A MOCA spokeswoman, however, denied that…”

It sounds as if the board might accept Eli Broads offer.
“The agreement, which the board voted on at a long meeting Thursday afternoon, is not final and is subject to numerous conditions, including Mr. Broad’s examinations of the museum’s financial accounts, according to the people, two of whom attended the meeting on Thursday.”

Los Angeles mayor Villaraigosa makes a plea to MOCA
“His letter to board co-chairmen Tom Unterman and David Johnson asks that the board take time to thoroughly review its options and set aside 30 days to allow the public an opportunity to provide input before a decision is made.”

Eli Broad asks LACMA to show him the money.
“The question, he said, is which bailout carries a stronger guarantee of secure funding for MOCA’s endowment and exhibitions: his $30-million offer or LACMA’s merger proposal, to which no price tag has been publicly attached.”

Trenton Doyle Hancock

December 19, 2008 · Print This Article

Photobucket

Last Friday Art21’s Blog posted a 45 minute interview with Trenton Doyle Hancock about his latest show at James Cohan Gallery.

“Hancock recently opened a new chapter in his ongoing saga of the war between a race of emaciated mutant Vegans and their fleshy Mound counterparts in Fear, his fourth solo show at James Cohan Gallery. But instead of painting scenes of all-out warfare, Hancock captures super-charged moments of tense waiting or vivid torture, suggesting that his epic narrative has reached a crossroads.”

It’s a bit long and after the halfway mark the audio is totally off from the footage. But it’s still worth taking a look at.

Saving MOCA

December 18, 2008 · Print This Article

Photobucket

Over the past week the financial crisis that has been plaguing L.A.’s MOCA has had some new developments. On Tuesday LACMA proposed a merger. According to the LA Time’s Culture Monster the terms of the merger would include; “…MOCA’s collection and programs would be exhibited at MOCA’s Geffen Contemporary Space in Little Tokyo, the Broad Contemporary Art Museum at LACMA and at LACMA’s Lynda and Stewart Resnick Exhibition Pavilion, under construction on the LACMA campus. Additional programs are planned for MOCA’s Grand Avenue site.” When asked if MOCA would part with some of it’s collection they responded with a not so confident probably not. Then Yesterday Christopher Knight gave it to use straight.

In other Los Angeles museum news The Getty’s Endowment is down 25%.

Whitney Names 2010 Biennial Curators

December 12, 2008 · Print This Article

Photobucket

You the Man Now Dog

I haven’t updated in a bout week. After returning from New York I was swamped with art students trying to print their final projects. Everything will be back to normal this coming week. I’m hoping to post a recap of art viewing from my trip and a recap of what is going on with MOCA. In the meantime, The New York times has an article on next years Whitney Biennial curators. Former BAS guest Francesco Bonami and Gary Carrion-Murayari have been named curators of the 2010 show.

via the New York Times:

“…First, the Biennial. Although it seems as if there just was one (there was, ending in June), officials at the Whitney Museum of American Art are already plotting the sequel, scheduled to open in March 2010. This week they are announcing the choice of curators, who in years past have consisted of
all-Whitney teams, groups of outsiders, or variations in between.

This time the museum has paired Francesco Bonami, 53, a seasoned Italian-born curator with an international reputation, and Gary Carrion-Murayari, 28, a homegrown senior curatorial assistant. Mr. Bonami will serve as curator for the Biennial, with Mr. Carrion-Murayari acting as associate curator.”

Read the entire article here

Dave Hickey in Vanity Fair

December 4, 2008 · Print This Article

Photobucket

I am in New York for the rest of the week so I there probably will be no posts until Monday. When I get back I’ll update with some of the shows I saw. In the meantime check out Dave Hickey’s piece in the December issue of Vanity Fair. Hickey recounts his experience from last years Frieze and Miami Basel shows.

via Dave Hickey for Vanity Fair

The Frieze Art Fair building is plopped down amid the verdure of Regent’s Park. I step out of the cab, take one look, and here’s what I think: if, rather than recruiting Tony Blair to attack Saddam Hussein, George W. Bush had simply attacked Tony Blair; and if, in the ensuing Armageddon of reciprocal fecklessness, George had actually won, the American officers’ mess in London would look a lot like the Frieze building. The interior, I know, will be temporaneo con amenità, the same M.D.F. and Euro-chic fixtures, the tall, transparent drapes in the lounge, the decorative chrome in the restrooms, and the scatterings of knockoff designer chairs. From the street, the interlocking white rectangular units are all but occluded by aggressive fencing and other accoutrements of surveillance. The security staff would suffice at Guantánamo, which sets me to imagining football mobs, driven berserk at the prospect of new drawings by Marlene Dumas.

In short, the building is scary, but I am a professional. I yank down the bill of my All Blacks cap, hunch my shoulders, and soldier through the rain, imagining my own diagonal traverse across the screen of a video monitor. Then I’m inside, and it’s just snooty art stuff. I walk up to the credentials window and receive a colored card that proclaims my degree of access. I get a really “good colored” card, but even so, I know that there are better cards. I know that there are people around me who have the best card, the Willy Wonka card that will pass them through enclosures of escalating exclusivity and ultimately bring them into the presence of … oh, I don’t know … maybe Sir Nicholas Serota, the very icon of Labor gentry, in a tan, glen plaid suit, comfortably disposed in a Gehry Power-Play Club Chair with a matching ottoman to support his Crockett & Jones wing tips. Sir Nicholas will turn, smile, and lift a snifter of brandy to welcome the chosen, and someone’s life will be complete.

continue reading this article here