LOADED: Hunting Culture In America reception tonight

March 18, 2009 · Print This Article

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Erika Larsen, Wedding Ring, 2004, C-print

If you’re in Chicago tonight go check out LOADED: Hunting Culture In America at the Glass Curtain Gallery. It’s co-currated by BAS own Audrey Mast.

“For millennia, we’ve slaked our taste for protein by hunting and killing other animals. But over the last century or so, as hunting has gradually become superfluous to survival (at least in this country), it has taken on a new role as a moral battleground. American hunting culture –– with its roots in notions of rugged individualism, the frontier spirit, and dominance over nature –– has become an aesthetic and a lifestyle choice, steeped in regional and family traditions. The works in Loaded: Hunting Culture in America take a deliberately ambivalent view toward the morality of hunting and address the subject as social, cultural, and artistic phenomenon, ideally nudging viewers to question their own preconceptions regarding hunting. These artists provoke a conversation, with the veracity of hunting as a backdrop, about how we interact with the natural world, particularly as Americans.”

LOADED includes work by:
David Buckingham, Kimberley Hart, Bob Lantz, Erika Larsen, Mathieu Lévesque, Brian Lesteberg, Diana Guerrero-Macía, Zoe Sheehan Saldana, Shaun Slifer, Jenn Wilson, Josh Winegar…and more!

LOADED is curated by Audrey Mast and Ann Wiens

Exhibition runs March 18 – April 29, 2009
Glass Curtain Gallery is at 1104 S Wabash, 1st Floor
Gallery Hours: M,T,W,F 9am-5pm, TH 9am – 7pm
Free and Open to the Public

Gareth James Tonight at SAIC

March 18, 2009 · Print This Article

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via:Visiting Artist Program at SAIC

Wednesday, March 18, 6:00 p.m.

“Based in New York, Gareth James is a British artist and writer whose work often addresses the physical and technological substructures of economic and political systems, of which Artforum says, ‘(James) seems less concerned with articulating meanings then with devising a way of making and representing that is commensurate with-and therefore perhaps capable of capturing and resisting-the diffuse, nonlinear, and extra-linguistic logic by which those systems operate.”

All lectures occur at SAIC Auditorium, 280 South Columbus Drive unless
otherwise indicated. Admission is $5 for general public, $3 for
students and seniors, and FREE for SAIC/AIC faculty, staff, and students.

Apartment Gallery in New York?

March 17, 2009 · Print This Article

apartment show in new yorkThis past weekend I went to an “apartment show” here in New York.  I was expecting the younger crowd, and of course, cheap beer instead of wine, a slightly later and over exuberant crowd, but I’ve got to pull out the Chicago street cred when I say that New York does not know how to run an apartment gallery like the Second City. Chicago has a long standing reputation of succesful alternatives to commercial gallery spaces, but they are in no way a sideshow to the main event.

What I saw here in New York is clearly respectable in the Tom Marioni sense, but I’ve got to stand my ground. Some things are better left to the midwest.

L.A. MOCA: Where Are They Now? + Rose Art Museum Symposium Tonight

March 16, 2009 · Print This Article

For those of you who’ve been following MOCA’s meltdown (see sidebar links to Meg’s previous posts on this subject)  and the Rose Art Museum’s deaccessioning debacle at Brandeis, there are a few interesting updates of the linkie sort I’d like to draw your attention to, in case you haven’t already seen them.

First, in the ‘where are they now’ category: two extensive, multi-part interviews with major MOCA players, one still hanging in there, the other out the door in a flash, have appeared within the last couple of weeks over at the Arts Journal blogs. Tyler Green of Modern Art Notes posts a four (!)-part interview with MOCA senior curator Paul Schimmel on the future of the institution, which sounds super-rosy and no less ambitious than before, according to Mr. Schimmel. Find ‘em here: Part one, part two, part three, and part four.

Next, there’s CultureGrrl aka Lee Rosenbaum’s two-part interview with Jeremy Strick about his post-MOCA post as the new director of the Nasher Museum: part one of her interview can be found here; part two, here. Strick seems to have landed very well, I must say; there’s hardly a speck of dust on him.

Lastly, the latest on The Rose Art Museum. From my understanding of the state of things now (mostly via this post on The Art Law Blog, which I got to via this one on Art Fag City), Brandeis has backpedaled from its original plans to sell off the Museum’s collection–now they’re saying that only “a limited number” of pieces will be sold “if the need arises in the future.” It’s anyone’s guess as to what’s true and what’s p.r. spin, but tonight, Monday March 16th, a symposium titled “Preserving Trust: Art and the Art Museum amidst Financial Crisis” will take place from 6:30 – 8:00 pm at The Rose Art Museum. You can view the discussion in real time, as it will also be streamed live, and posted on YouTube afterwards.  Here’s an excerpt from the Symposium blurb:

This symposium is prompted by the global controversy over the recently proposed closing of Brandeis University’s Rose Art Museum and the selling of some or all of its permanent collection of modern and contemporary art, in order to meet general university financial needs. At a time of financial crisis, what is the utility of art and of museums, in universities and in other contexts? Is art the most dispensable and disposable of assets when times are tough? Conversely, might art and museums be understood as especially valuable at moments of economic and social distress, helping to remind a society of its core values, exposing citizens to cultural difference, and providing vital spaces for community-building and democratic debate?

Panelists include:

  • Claire Messud
  • Robert Pinsky
  • Stephen Greenblatt

Commentators include:

  • Katy Graddy
  • Dirck Roosevelt
  • Andreas Teuber
  • Brian Friedberg and Liz McDonough

Moderator: Mark Auslander
Note: The proceedings will be streamed live on the Cultural Production ustream channel, and also posted on YouTube. Co-coordinators: Mark Auslander, Dirck Roosevelt, Ramie Targoff, Andreas Teuber

Saturday Night Art Seen

March 14, 2009 · Print This Article

Someone alerted me to this photo they saw of me in the gossip column of ArtForum (better known as “Scene and Herd”) and I thought I would use it to illustrate the magic of cropping:

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There I am standing in front of that photograph at the opening of Walead Beshty’s show at Wallspace just on the other side of that wall that cuts into the left of the picture…

S and H uncropped

Psych, actually I’m standing behind that other more important looking guy (happens to be the Director of White Columns) at the edge of the photograph.

I found this mildly entertaining in the context of conceptual photography, a popular brand in which Beshty always has one foot.    This show where I happened to be “scene” follows two veins of Beshty’s work, although I imagine they are meant to be taken together as a record of the process.  The first is the prominently featured abstract photograms.  These large sheets of color photo paper are somehow folded or rolled in the exposure process.  This is only gleaned from looking at them, so I’m not sure what the process is actually, but it seems sufficient to take away that these colors and shapes are not chosen but rather arbitrarily arrived at through a photographic process.  In the other works — black and white portraits of the people, places, and machines that have helped Besthy along the way to producing his work — he likewise lets his process do all the decision making. Notice here the photogram that actually hangs off of the center wall.

Beshty at Wallspace

This placement was arrived at again by some system of finding the center of walls… I don’t think the point is actually to understand the system in place, but rather to see that there is a system, and recognize it as arbitrarily imposed… After all I think that is the underlying critique even found in this rhyming press release:

Whatever Marxist schadenfreude might be gleaned from black-and-white
Effectively reclaims the found object as a multivalent political site

Of the show’s relaxed attitude toward lines of demarcation
which, sexy as it sounded, felt like little more than rhetorical lubrication

Among the most special is Walead Beshty’s photo-slide meditation
Here flashy surface need not come at the cost of art historical, conceptual, and
socio-political elaboration

After my brush with the art world paparazzi I’ve decided to lay low, but I will be venturing out tonight to see two openings that look promising.  First, “It’s You. Not me” at Andrew Kreps in Chelsea.  Second, and honestly more exciting, is the first solo show in four years for the painter Richard Phillips at Gagosian uptown.  I’ll leave you with some enticing words from Phillips himself and follow up later with my conclusions on the show:

“At its core, this show is the conflict between capitalism, fascism, and communism. It looks into the nature of representation, propaganda, and misinformation, and how they redirect the ideologies of institutions.”