What to say about Jim Jarmusch’s new film?

May 5, 2009 · Print This Article

thelimitsofcontrolmoviestilFrom the opening shot of Isaach de Bankole waving Tai Chi gestures in a bathroom stall, I could see this was a beautifully composed film.  From the first line, “You don’t speak Spanish, right?” it was also clear that this would be a Jarmush film.  Beyond these two facts, I’m not sure what to make of it.  Has the legacy of European Cinema in America unravelled itself so much that a Lone Man finds his purpose in vengeance against some toupée-wearing Philistine?  It seems Jarmusch has taken the best of mentors and contemporaries such as Wim Wenders and Claire Denis, along with the worst from the Hollywood echoe chamber of happy endings and pretentious self-indulgences.  Aside from the words of bad reviews, however, I would like to say that it is a risky film.  It’s a film to take in pieces, just as each clue is delivered to the Lone Man.  My sense is that those who too heavily criticize the sense of the narrative miss the point, but those that indulge in the inner world of Jarmush fail to see the forest for the trees.  Can you tell the difference? 

BAS Giveaway: PHONEBOOK vol.2: 2008/2009

May 5, 2009 · Print This Article

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Up for grabs this week is PHONEBOOK vol.2 published by threewalls and Green Lantern Press. Third person to email me (megonli@badatsports.com) gets the copy. Thanks Caroline for hooking us up!

via threewalls:
“Back by popular demand, PHONEBOOK is the essential travel guide to artist-run centers, small not-for-profit, fringe galleries and other exhibition and presentation projects.

This new edition adds over 50 news spaces in the United States and over 40 Canadian centers alongside updated entries, periodical listings, a series of essays from across the country and some road-trip tips from the editors.

PHONEBOOK is a valuable resource for artist and audience alike, connecting a web of makers and projects while acting as an archive of work by smaller organizations and groups throughout the visual arts community. Use PHONEBOOK as a research tool, as a travel guide to the visual arts, for networking, for exhibition proposals or to facilitate artistic exchanges.”

Get your copy here.

Automata, The Art of a Moment Relived.

May 5, 2009 · Print This Article

jonhaddockdonttasemebroFrom the “Don’t Tase me Bro” incident to the Raping and murder of Abeer Qassim al-Janabi by Pte. Green, Automata can capture a moment unlike anything else. Jon Haddock’s work does that better then anything i have seen in a long while.

Interview with NEXT First-Timers Mahan Gallery

May 4, 2009 · Print This Article

Colleen Grennan of Mahan Gallery

Colleen Grennan of Mahan Gallery

Mahan Gallery owner/director Jacqueline Mahan and her associate director Colleen Grennan are both art fair newbies, or at least they were before participating in NEXT this past weekend.  Mahan Gallery, which is widely regarded as one of the best galleries for younger contemporary artists in Columbus, Ohio, has been open for almost five years. At NEXT, their booth featured the paintings and drawings of Ric Ocasek (yes, that Ric Ocasek).

On Monday, the last day of the fair, I asked Grennan to share some thoughts about her experience at NEXT/Art Chicago.

How did you like NEXT? Was it a positive experience for you?

Definitely. We’ve been able to meet and network with so many galleries that we hadn’t made personal physical contact with before now. (After being open for five years) we’re finally at a level where we felt we could contribute something to an art fair. Being here has kind of broken a psychological barrier for us. We’ve learned so much about what other galleries are doing, about new artists that are out there. It’s been a learning process – we overpacked artwork, for one thing. We’re learning where to stay, what to do, how to effectively network. Jacquie and I were both able to see what other galleries were doing and I think it will give us the courage to do even more challenging exhibitions ourselves.

Were you happy with your sales?

Our sales were really low. We did sell some work but definitely did not  cover what we paid to get here. Sales seem to have been low with everyone we talked to. One dealer told us in past years, booths would sell out at the preview. So (the sales end of things) was a disappointment to us.

Were you able to go to any of the talks, panels and discussions?

I was able to go to two talks, and I found them both to be valuable. This fair is about the young and the new, so we see it as an opportunity to immerse ourselves and just soak up everything it had to offer.

What kind of response did Ric Ocasek’s work receive?

“Is that Ric Ocasek from the Cars? Wow, I didn’t know he was an artist!” That was always the first reaction. This fair, and his April show at our gallery, are the first times he’s ever shown his work publically, so there is always some initial surprise. Then people would get into the work and get excited about seeing this person that they know as a musician in terms of his work as a visual artist. People could make connections with him in new ways.

So what do you think you’ll take away from your experience here?

Personally it’s made me think a lot about how to engage local audiences and a larger national audience at the same time. We’re ready for that next step as a gallery and being here has given us the opportunity to think about how to position ourselves and to get our name on the map outside of Columbus.

Ric Ocasek at Mahan Gallery

Ric Ocasek at Mahan Gallery

Ric Ocasek at Mahan Gallery

Ric Ocasek at Mahan Gallery

Ric Ocasek at Mahan Gallery/NEXT booth

Ric Ocasek at Mahan Gallery/NEXT booth

Ass-kicking Mama Artists at NEXT

May 4, 2009 · Print This Article

Danielle Gustafson-Sundell, for all the sweet mamas out there, 2009

Danielle Gustafson-Sundell, for all the sweet mamas out there, 2009

This piece, exhibited at Gallery 400’s ‘Better to light a candle than curse the dark’ presentation at NEXT/Art Chicago, wins my award for most personally meaningful work of art encountered at the Merchandise Mart. Last Friday, I rounded a corner and saw it, and it summed up everything I had been feeling that day, that week, and every single day of my life for the past three years. I’m told women were lining up to get their picture taken next to it. So thank you for making this piece, Danielle Gustafson-Sundell. You kick ass!