Goffo at NEXT

May 6, 2009 · Print This Article

Imperfect Articles at Goffo/NEXT

Imperfect Articles at Goffo/NEXT

Goffo, the show of prints, multiples, artist’s books and editions at NEXT, was terrific. Lots of affordable art, presesented in a casual, laid-back, communal atmosphere. My favorite part of the Fair.

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Goffo at NEXT

Goffo at NEXT

Goffo at NEXT

Goffo at NEXT

I went to NEXT and all I got was this

May 6, 2009 · Print This Article

oh-so-soft t-shirt, by artist Erin Allen at Maniac Gallery. Seriously, the thing is super-soft, I’m not usually a t-shirt wearer but I love this and it fits me perfectly and I haven’t wanted to take it off since I bought it.  Which could spell trouble for me at my kid’s school picnic, but I’ll deal with those issues later.

erin-allen-at-maniac-gallery

Editors Leave Art + Auction, Modern Painters and ArtInfo.com

May 6, 2009 · Print This Article

Via yesterday’s Mediabistro email newsletter, Revolving Door :

“Louise Blouin Media is in chaos: While “The Red Queen” flits around Europe, her employees are suffering pay cuts of at least 12 percent and top editors are leaving in droves. Art+Auction editor-in-chief Anthony Freund and executive editor Ted Loos resigned on Friday, and former Fulcrum EIC Marisa Bartolucci replaces the pair as editorial director. Chris Turner and David Grosz, editors of Modern Painters and ArtInfo.com, are also departing LBM. Mitchell Martin, formerly from Forbes.com, takes over at the latter publication, while former Forbes staffers Ruthie Ackerman, Bruce Janicke, and Ali Privitera are also joining the company….”

Art Chicago Wrapup: Special Exhibitions Edition

May 6, 2009 · Print This Article

Today I’ll be posting some images and brief commentary on this past weekend’s Artropolis/Art Chicago/NEXT fairs. There was a lot to see and unfortunately I couldn’t adequately document it all, so consider these posts in terms of what they’re meant to be:  snapshot images of work that intrigued me, some of which has stayed with me long enough to want to find out more about the artist in the future. In a number of instances the pictures I took were poorly lit or otherwise crappy, and it would have been a disservice to the artist to post them,  so take this as a partial and anecdotal summation, not as some sort of Top 10 -type list which I pretty much detest anyway.
All of the Special Exhibitions were very well done, although I think calling out certain works in the booths as part of the Fair’s so-called “Salute to Realism” was a bit strange. As I mentioned in a previous post, I personally liked Lynn Warren’s Hairy Who presentations the best, but I learned something from every exhibition on view and in general thought they all worked pretty well in an art fair context. There was a lot to see, and my picture-taking skills are at level zero, but here’s what I was able to capture while on the 12th floor.
New Insight (I think this was actually at NEXT, on the 7th floor, but whatever): This was an exhibition of  MFA students from some of the country’s top graduate art programs, curated by Renaissance Society director Susanne Ghez. The pool of art schools included Cal Arts, Carnegie Mellon, Cranbrook, Hunter, Maryland Institute College of Art, Rhode Island School of Design, School of the Art Institute of Chicago, San Francisco Art Institute, UCLA, University of Illinois at Chicago, University of Illinois at Urbana, and Yale. Some interesting work here; ironically I never got a photo of Jesse Mclean’s 6 min. video of reality show losers “Somewhere Only We Know,” although I think it was probably the best work in that show.
Ryan Sluggett (UCLA), Untitled 2008, acrylic, solvent transfer on canvas.

Ryan Sluggett (UCLA), Untitled 2008, acrylic, solvent transfer on canvas.

Nery Gabriel Lemus (California Institute of Art), Praxis within the politicization of my formative years, 2009, installation shot.

Nery Gabriel Lemus (California Institute of Art), Praxis within the politicization of my formative years, 2009, installation shot.

Im Schafer, (Cranbrook), Area Codes, 2008, slipcast ceramics, automotive paint, chrome, neoprene, wood

Im Schafer, (Cranbrook), Area Codes, 2008, slipcast ceramics, automotive paint, chrome, neoprene, wood.

Kristof Wickman (Hunter College), Untitled, 2008, laminate, mixed media.

Kristof Wickman (Hunter College), Untitled, 2008, laminate, mixed media.

Kristof Wickman (Hunter College), Untitled, 2008, laminate, mixed media.

Kristof Wickman (Hunter College), Untitled, 2008, laminate, mixed media.

Society for Contemporary Art’s Acquisition Selection for 2009
Members of the Society for Contemporary Art of Chicago met last Sunday to choose from works by Paul Chan, Rebecca Morris, Nancy Spero, Matt Mullican, and Martin Barre. Apologies, but I could not get a half-way decent shot of Barre’s “76-77-C,” oil on canvas painting, nor could I find an image of it online.
Matt Mullican, Untitled (Before Birth), Untitled (Death), Untitled (Sign), Untitled (Heaven), 1980, sign paint on paper. A Society for Contemporary Art Acquisition Selection

Matt Mullican, Untitled (Before Birth), Untitled (Death), Untitled (Sign), Untitled (Heaven), 1980, sign paint on paper. A Society for Contemporary Art Acquisition Selection.

Paul Chan, a Society for Contemporary Art Acquisition Selection

Paul Chan, 6th Light, from the series 7 Lights, 2007, digital video projection. A Society for Contemporary Art Acquisition Selection.

Rebecca Morris, Untitled (#15-07), 2007, a Society for Contemporary Art Acquisitions Selection

Rebecca Morris, Untitled (#15-07), 2007, oil on canvas. A Society for Contemporary Art Acquisitions Selection.

Nancy Spero, Woman Breathing, 1978, hand print on paper, a Society for Contemporary Art acquisitions selection

Nancy Spero, Woman Breathing, 1978, hand print on paper. A Society for Contemporary Art acquisitions selection.

Partisan: Another special exhibition was the Mary Jane Jacob-curated Partisan, a group show of work selected from galleries exhibiting at Art Chicago “dedicated to the artistic exploration of social and political ideas.” You know, take what you will from a show of political art at an art fair. It’s a brave thing to attempt and I respect the effort, I’m just not sure how much attention viewers are willing to pay to a show like this one when there’s so much distraction surrounding them.
Partisan at Art Chicago

Partisan at Art Chicago.

Peter Drake, Horn, 2008, acrylic on canvas, at Partisan/Art Chicago.

Peter Drake, Horn, 2008, acrylic on canvas, at Partisan/Art Chicago. (Photo from Linda Warren Gallery)

Partisan at Art Chicago

Partisan at Art Chicago.

Dinh Q. Le, Untitled from the Hill of Poisonous Trees (two men), at Partisan/Art Chicago

Dinh Q. Le, Untitled from the Hill of Poisonous Trees (two men), at Partisan/Art Chicago. Photo from Artnet; PPOW Gallery.

Dinh Q. Le at Partisan / Art Chicago

Dinh Q. Le at Partisan / Art Chicago.

Tania Bruguera, San Titulo (Habana, 2000), 2006, lambda print

Tania Bruguera, San Titulo (Habana, 2000), 2006, lambda print, at Partisan/Art Chicago.

Wendy and Lucy

May 5, 2009 · Print This Article

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On Sunday I went to Doc Films to check out Kelly Reichardt’s (“Old Joy”, “River of Grass”) latest film “Wendy and Lucy”. The film is only 120 minutes. In that time we wander through a Pacific Northwest town as Wendy (Michelle Williams) attempts to find her dog, fix her car, and continue her way to Alaska. I went into the film thinking of it as a classic road trip movie. When I left I felt like the film was much more about the struggles that people face when interacting with strangers.

Both the film and Williams have received a lot of critical acclaim. I found it easy to believe the situations that Wendy faced and the amount of strength the character had to gather in order to make it through the 3 days that we see. I also liked the ambiguity of the previous circumstances that led her to where she is. As a character Wendy is rather solemn, for obvious reasons, while Lucy, her golden dog with floppy ears, appears to be one of the few things that actually holds her together.

The plot is a little sparse which I think gives Williams the opportunity to shine. One of the more pivotal scenes in the film is when a friendly security guard hands Wendy a wad of money and insists that she takes it. Once he leaves, its hard not to feel the devastating blow that what had looked like a lot of money was actually only $7.

A. O. Scott summed up the poignancy of the film, “But underneath this plain narrative surface — or rather, resting on it the way a smooth stone rests in your palm — is a lucid and melancholy inquiry into the current state of American society. Much as “Old Joy” turned a simple encounter between two longtime friends into a meditation on manhood and responsibility at a time of war and political confusion, so does “Wendy and Lucy” find, in one woman’s partly self-created hard luck, an intimation of more widespread hard times ahead.”

Wendy and Lucy is available today, May 5th on dvd.