VAP at SAIC | Narelle Jubelin

September 15, 2009 · Print This Article

PhotobucketThis season’s theme for SAIC’s Visiting Artist Program is Living Modern. The program will be linked with the exhibition of the same title at SAIC’s Sullivan Galleries. “Bridging the historic roots of American modernism with the critical practices of contemporary artists and architects, the Learning Modern lecture series focuses on the presence of the Modern today and its vital role in education in the mid-20th century.”

The first artist in this series is Narelle Jubelin. Other artists to follow for this program are Kathleen James-Chakraborty, Andrea Deplazes, Jun Nguyen Hatsushiba,  Christian Veddeler, Liisa Roberts, and Jorge Pardo.

Via VAP

“Narelle Jubelin, an Australian artist based in Madrid, revisits aspects of modernist perception for the twenty-first century. Known for works that weave through legacies of education, art, architecture, memory, and cultural heritage, Jubelin will reflect on her latest project, Key Notes, on view in the Learning Modern exhibition. In this work, transcriptions of critical modernist texts are embedded into sumptuously colored fabrics, creating a site-specific environment of narrative, geometric planes in homage to Mies van der Rohe and his collaborator Lilly Reich.”

Wednesday, September 16, 6:00pm
SAIC Columbus Auditorium, 280 S. Columbus Drive

For more information on this event and other lectures from the VAP please check out their website

Buying Young: 10 Reasons to Start Collecting Art When You’re, Like, in Your Early Twenties.

September 14, 2009 · Print This Article

Conventional wisdom tells us that the the time to buy art is when you’re older and have attained a degree of financial security, right? I’ve learned from personal experience that this kind of logic is completely backwards. Sure, now that I’m older and more “settled,” I technically have more in the bank, but trust me — it ‘aint that much more. I had a lot more spare cash to spend on art when I was just starting out than I do now, largely because I’m no longer able to say, ‘what the hell, I’ll just go out less next month’ and drop a few hundred dollars on a drawing just because I happen to love it. When you’re young you can scale back drastically in one area of your life without it dramatically affecting the other parts. That’s not necessarily the case when you’re older and have dependents. Which leads me to reason number one for buying art as early as you possibly can:

1. It may not seem like it now, but if you’re in a line of work that’ll basically keep you in the middle class the rest of your life, if you’re lucky (cough-nonprofit world), your early twenties may well be the only time  you’ll have any measure of disposable income to spend on what *you* want to spend it on without feeling guilty that it should be put somewhere else.

2. When you’re young you can still buy what you like without having to check with someone else first. This may be a fairly big assumption, of course, but when you’re in your twenties you’re less likely to have partnered up for the longterm or share a bank account.  Thus, you don’t have to worry about your partner’s veto power over what hangs on your walls.

3. Following on Reason #2, buying art when you’re young and still fancy-free provides an invaluable opportunity to develop your own tastes over time. Sure, it’s fun to buy with a partner, but it’s also important to formulate your own aesthetic sensibility apart from that, so you don’t wind up being the one who nods stupidly and says “I leave these kinds of decisions up to him/her” while reaching for the checkbook.

4. When you’re young,you’re less likely to have had kids. And, by extension, a house/mortgage. Once you have either of these things, believe me, unless you’re already firmly ensconced in the upper ranges of middle class you’re much more likely to feel guilty about big purchases that don’t in some way involve the kids and/or house. Yeah, I know art feeds the soul and I absolutely agree that it’s important to have lots of it around the house in one form or another, but when you have to choose between fixing the broken backyard fence or buying that painting you fell in love with last weekend, it can be much harder to choose the latter when you think your kids’ well-being may be at stake.

5. If you start buying young, your collection will be more than a collection. It’ll serve as a unique narrative of your own personal history dating from early adulthood. This one is true whether you choose to have kids or not. What was it about that particular work that made you want to buy it? What did you have to sacrifice in order to get it? Did you have a personal relationship with the artist? Artworks remind you of where you were in your life when you bought them, not just geographically but socially and psychologically, too.

6. On the whole, when you’re younger, the art you like tends to be less expensive and thus, affordable even on a student’s budget. You’re young, you’re hanging around kids like yourself and thus you tend to go to the types of apartment galleries and indie spaces where younger artists show, and the prices reflect that. I’m here to encourage you: don’t just look, think about buying that $50 drawing. Take advantage of the fact that the artists in your circle are still selling their work relatively cheaply. That won’t necessarily be the case forever.

7. Consider the time-honored tradition of the trade.  Many artists acquire art by trading some of their own work (or services, if they don’t make objects) for someone else’s work or services. Artists already know about this one, so I don’t have to belabor the point other than to note that not everyone in the art world can ethically make a trade.

8. Think about purchasing art instead of updating to the latest version of your iPod, iPhone, Mac computer, or, um, buying drugs.  The painting that blew your mind at last weekend’s opening? Maybe it’s it the $200-$500 range. If you don’t buy the new iPhone and are willing to stretch out your stash, dude, that painting could be yours! It’s a cliche, but it’s still true: the art will last longer. Wait for the next iteration of the technology to come out and buy that piece of art now.  When you’re old and gray you’ll still be looking at it; the drugs and the iPhone, on the other hand, will have long ago been consumed.

9. Buying young enables you to grow your tastes alongside those of an artist or gallery. Assuming that the art you’re buying in your early twenties is, by necessity, that made or exhibited by other youngsters like you, you’ll be establishing yourself as a supporter of these people early on. This relationship may or may not carry forward into the future, but by all rights it should. The artist will remember you as one of his/her earliest collectors; the gallery will know that you do indeed give a shit about the work they show and take you seriously when you come in. If you happen to strike it rich or just do a little bit better as you get older and (hopefully) move forward professionally, you might find yourself in a position to buy slightly more expensive work by this or other artists. If the dealer is smart, she’ll remember you made that early purchase way back when and help you obtain something that might not otherwise be within your grasp.

10. Buying artwork is exhilarating, especially when you buy something that’s a little pricier than you can afford but you can’t help yourself. Try it. See what I mean? And even if you’re buying a $25 drawing and tacking it over your night stand, buying art makes you feel like a grownup who cares about the beauty of your surroundings.

In conclusion: You don’t have to buy expensive work to have a “real” art collection. Some socially well-connected artists don’t even have to “buy” anything at all; but this post has been written for those of you who don’t necessarily have those kinds of connections and need to spend your own hard-earned dollars in order to make an artwork yours. A fine collection of small-scale drawings in the $10-15 range purchased at art benefits, holiday art school sales etc. can be amassed without a lot of financial pain. No matter how inexpensive the purchase, take whatever you buy seriously by framing it as soon as possible (better for the art, better looking on your walls), displaying it prominently and with flair, and looking at it often. Whenever possible, scrimp a bit on the essentials so you can splurge on art. Trust me, it gets a whole lot harder to do that once that thing they call “real life” takes over.

My Bloody Wedding

September 13, 2009 · Print This Article

Everybody loves a zombie movie. I recently saw the trailer for a new film, My Bloody Wedding, and got to ask a few questions to the writer and star Morgan C. Mead. Not to be confused with Morgan D. Mead who cowrote the screenplay and directed the film.

From the website:

A feature length comedy about Doug, a dorky young mamma’s boy, who is about to get married to his beautiful bride, Callista, when he notices a change come over her. He catches her sneaking around at night and lying to him…and she’s begun to display flu-like symptoms. So naturally Doug thinks she caught a disease while cheating on him. In reality she has become possessed via an ancient stone and she’s been eating his friends and family without him knowing. When the truth comes out Doug and his remaining groomsmen (his best friend, his robot, and a Luchador) must team up with a psychotic gardener to stop Callista and her demon-possessed bridesmaids before they kill everyone in sight.

Why does the world need another zombie movie, especially now?

Oh gosh! I feel that now more than ever people are looking to escape! With the state of the economy; with work; or maybe without work, people have a lot on their minds. I am a big fan of giving the mind a break. My Bloody Wedding is definitely a good break from everyday thought. To me zombie movies are like romantic comedies – they can be done over and over again in so many different ways. Ours is a comedy/horror. It’s more of a story about a misunderstood “possessed spirit”, a love story. My college thesis was about postmodernism. It’s been going on for centuries. I guess this was my first hats off attempt.

What attracted you to this genre?

I think the idea of a ton of blood and laughs attracted me. I always go toward contradictions. How can I make light of something dark? How can I look at something different than the norm? Also, horror fans are incredibly loyal. I have a ton of respect for that kind of commitment.

What was your inspiration for the screenplay?

Inspiration? Oy! I think that we subconsciously gather inspiration all of our lives. It wasn’t until the actual shoot that I got to see what had inspired me. I must say my main inspiration was Morgan Mead; that’s right! Not me, but another Morgan Mead that I cowrote the movie with. We inspired one another. We wrote the movie from different locations and every draft back and forth was a taunt to make the screenplay better.

You can become a fan on facebook, and keep your eyes out for it to be released around February 2010.

Whitney Tassie | moniquemeloche’s New Space

September 11, 2009 · Print This Article

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moniquemeloche's new space pre build out

moniquemeloche has been a staple in the West Loop for 8 years. Recently Monique announced that the gallery would be moving to a secret location. This Saturday they will kick off their new space with a show by Robert Davis and Michael Langlois. The always lovely Whitney Tassie was nice enough to answer a few questions about their new location and what they have planned for their Fall schedule.

Could you tell me a little bit about the new location of moniquemeloche Gallery? What made you guys decided to leave the West Loop?

Our 5 year lease on Peoria was up in August and we wanted something new. We decided to make a significant leap to a neighborhood not known for art galleries. Our new space is at 2154 West Division. It is deliberately smaller but not tiny. Over the last year or so we’ve been collaborating on a number projects outside the gallery, both in Chicago and internationally, in galleries, museums, and art fairs as well as hotels, unsold condo developments, design showrooms, empty retail spaces, etc. We have adjusted our gallery program to have longer exhibitions, about 5 or 6 a year, and are excited to focus our curatorial energies beyond the gallery as well.


What do you and Monique have planned for your Fall schedule?

@ moniquemeloche, 2154 W Division

September 12 – October 31, 2009 : Robert Davis and Michael Langlois In Our Likeness: Portraits of Illumination

November 7 – December 19, 2009:  Recession Proof
 Additionally, we are in the planning stages of organizing a series of site-specific wall projects for the window of our new space. The 1st will be by Carla Arocha and Stephane Schraenen to coincide with the unveiling of their permanent installation “24/7,” a commission by the CTA for the Howard Station.

 

@ The James Hotel
now thru Nov: Davis & Langlois paintings, concurrent with their 12×12 exhibition at the MCA

Nov-Dec: Carrie Schneider photographs, concurrent with her 12×12 exhibition at the MCA

 

@ the Art Hall at The Blackstone

Ongoing: Kendell Carter: Drip Paintings

Any Fairs that you guys will be attending?

Monique will be attending Frieze this October as Carla Arocha and Stephane Schraenen have a solo show opening at the same time at Vegas Gallery in London. Then we’re headed to NADA in Miami. We’ll be showing three sculptures by Justin Cooper, Rashid Johnson, and Joel Ross.

Your opening is on Saturday with Robert Davis and Michael Langlois. Could you tell me a little bit about the show?

This is our 3rd solo exhibition of collaborative artists Robert Davis and Michael Langlois. The show consists of 5 graphite portrait drawings. This from the artists “This is our Illuminati, the council of elders, a dinner party wish list serving Beluga and Dom. Like Bill and Ted flying through time collecting greatness in order to save the world we have culled our shepards.” More info is available on our website.

moniquemeloche is now located at:

2154 W. Division (@ Leavitt)
Chicago, IL 60622

For more info on the gallery check out their site

Bad at Sports’ Fall Art Picks

September 11, 2009 · Print This Article

Times are tough, but there’s a lot to look forward to with the coming Fall art season in Chicago. Here’s what Meg and I are most looking forward to seeing over the next three months — and be sure to check out Stephanie’s guide to Friday and Saturday openings below!

Philip Von Zweck

Philip Von Zweck at ThreeWalls

9/11 Philip Von Zweck at ThreeWalls (M, C) The title of this show is “The Fortieth Anniversary of the First Anniversary of May ’68 (in September).” Von Zweck is a significant and much-beloved figure in the Chicago art scene who ran a highly respected apartment gallery for a number of years. This exhibition marks his return to a more traditional solo artist exhibition framework.

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Luis Gispert at Rhona Hoffman Gallery

9/11 Luis Gispert at Rhona Hoffman (C) New large-scale photographic portraits and videos by the Miami-born, Brooklyn-based Gispert that focus on immigrant sectors of the American workforce and the search for expressive outlets outside the realm of labor. A three-channel film focuses on Gispert’s friend Rene, a Cuban immigrant who works in a Miami restaurant supply store.

9/11 Jessica Labatte at Scott Projects (M). Labatte’s exhibition Bright Branches documents found objects collected from Chicago alleys and junk stores.

9/11 Craig Doty: Women at Roots and Culture (M,C). The women in Doty’s new photographic series have been described as appearing “physically exhausted as well as ethically or morally debased,” i.e. a wet and shivering woman looking out past viewers with few narrative clues as to why, etc. Given Choire Sicha’s description of Doty as “a sick little pervert” whose previous body of work was “very John Hughes meets John Waters meets John Lydon,” well, let’s just say we can’t wait to see his approach to the subject for ourselves.

Doug Ischar at Golden Gallery

Doug Ischar at Golden Gallery

9/12 Doug Ischar at Golden (M,C). A body of work from 1985, never before seen in its entirety, is the enticement here. Ischar’s show is titled Marginal Waters and features images taken in Chicago’s now-defunct Belmont Rocks.

9/19 Jonas Wood at Shane Campbell Gallery (C). He’s from L.A. and showed at Black Dragon Society, plus he’s collaborated with painter Mark Grotjahn…for now, that’s all I need to know to want to see Wood’s show.

9/19 Jason Lazarus, Wolfgang Plöger, Zoe Strauss at The Art Institute (M). A show of recent photographic acquisitions of these artists’ works by the Art Institute.

9/20 Allen Sekula, Polonia and Other Fables at The Renaissance Society (C). New photographs by anti-globalization hero Sekula that focus on Chicago’s rich labor history, its Polish working-class population along with The University of Chicago’s famous lineage of economic theorists. Heady yet vital stuff from this woefully under-recognized L.A.-based artist.

9/25 – 9/27 Mikhail Baryshnikov at Harris Theater (M). It’s Baryshnikov dude. ‘Nuff said.

Greely Myatt in Heartland at Smart Museum of Art

Greely Myatt in Heartland at Smart Museum of Art

9/30 Heartland at the Smart Museum (C). Coorganized by the Smart Museum of Art and the Van Abbemuseum, a survey of artists from the Midwest aka the American Heartland. Hopefully it’ll subvert the syrupy connotations of it’s title, or at least be the kind of show that people argue, bitch and moan about rather than simply ignore.

10/2 – 10/4  Western Exhibitions and Golden Age at the NY Art Book Fair (M). The only event to make it to our list that is not in Chicago. If your in New York at the beginning of October check out two Chicagoans holding it down at the Fair.

October, opening date TBA, Carroll Dunham at He Said/She Said (C). Carroll Dunham shows in a suburban apartment gallery: the Oak Park home of Pamela Fraser and Randall Szott. Can’t wait for this.

10/8-21 Chicago International Film Festival (M) In it’s 45th year the film festival the two week festival is the hub for all film fanatics.  This festival might be the only time to catch certain films so be sure to check out their schedule in advance.

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Jeremy Deller at The Museum of Contemporary Art

10/10 Jeremy Deller: It Is What It Is: Conversations About Iraq, at the MCA (M) Commissioned by The Three M Project Jeremy Deller will invite numerous participants to discuss their knowledge of the Iraq War. Some guest will include verterans, and scholars.
James Welling at Donald Young (C)

10/10 Playing with Pictures: The Art of Victorian Photocollage at The Art Institute (C). I’m a sucker for Victoriana, and this exhibition –the first “to comprehensively examine the little-known phenomenon of Victorian photocollage, presenting work that has rarely—and in many cases never—before been displayed or reproduced” — is probably the one show I’m most looking forward to seeing this fall. A medium mostly practiced by aristocratic women, Victorian photocollage combined human, animal, and botanical forms in all sorts of wacky and whimsical ways, and I’m looking forward to reading the accompanying full-color catalogue to learn more about the ways that female artists of this era approached the form some sixty odd years before Picasso and Braque started playing around with it.

10/13 Alex Halsted and David Moré at Gallery 400 (C). Chicago-based Moré “collaborates” with an elephant nose fish, who emits an electrical pulse as a navigation tool which the artist then amplifies. I love the gallery’s blurb on this show: “This performance duo mixes issues of displacement, communications, commercial sound and inter-species contact in a singularly engaging bio-tech format.” Yep, pretty much says it all.

10/16 In Search of the Mundane at ThreeWalls (M) Organized by Randall Szott and InCUBATE  According to ThreeWalls this series will , “include boozy brunches, a lecture on the art of storytelling, various leisure excursions, and a tour of personal collections.”

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Liam Gillick at the MCA

10/17  Liam Gillick Curates the MCA Collection (M, C). We love the way that the MCA is experimenting with the curation of its permanent collection. The MCA has invited Liam Gillick to select works for its next hanging.

11/TBA James Welling at Donald Young (C).  New work by L.A. photographer Welling, whose ongoing interest in the experimental and abstract possibilities of photography set his work apart from contemporaries like Sherrie Levine and Cindy Sherman as well as today’s younger generation focusing heavily on portraiture. Welling’s last show at Donald Young featured photograms of flowers and “torsos” (the latter actually made out of screens sculpted to resemble human curves) made without the use of a camera; the results were gorgeous, and I’m looking forward to seeing what he delves into next.

12/4 Carrie Schneider at MCA 12×12 (M, C)  Often using herself as her main character, Schneider  melds several genres of art-making including body art, performance, self-portraiture photography and film in images that are haunting, creepy, and hallucinatory in their resonance. If someone ever gave Schneider a huge project budget she could give Matthew Barney a run for his money, but for now we’ll look forward to seeing the new short film Schneider plans to premiere in her first solo museum outing at the MCA. According to the MCA’s website, the film, made in Helsinki, Finland while the artist was there on residency, continues the artists’ ongoing exploration of doubled selves and the uncanny.