I want my “Team Tavi” T-Shirt NOW!

January 6, 2010 · Print This Article

Art people, are you reading Style Rookie? If you’re not, I’m here to say I think you should be. Although I myself tend to stay away from fashion and style blogs, because looking at things I could never buy for myself tends to make me feel bitter and depressed and old, I am obsessed with Style Rookie. It’s a blog about fashion and pop culture written by Tavi Gevinson, a thirteen year old girl who lives in a suburb just outside of Chicago (I’m thinking it’s the same one that I live in, but who knows). Tavi–already famous enough to be known by her first name only–was recently profiled in the Chicago Tribune in an article on successful teen fashion bloggers who are garnering attention not just from fashion-conscious tween readers but from fashion designers, stylists, and magazine editors themselves. (Read the Tribune’s article, published on December 30, 2009, here). The article describes Tavi’s rise to fame amongst the fashion set, and also contained some sniping about the pint-sized blogger’s success from a few jealous hags (sorry, I meant to say “fashion editors”). [Read more]

Watch Mat Collishaw Discuss “Hysteria” at Freud Museum

January 6, 2010 · Print This Article

File this under exhibitions I really wish I could have traveled to see. UK artist, “Secret Victorian” and David Duchovny lookalike Mat Collishaw recently created an installation at the Freud Museum in London titled “Hysteria” that reframed psychoanalytic discourse by way of Freud’s treatment (so to speak) of women. Collishaw and the Freud Museum are definitely an inspired pairing.  Although Freud only lived in the London home for about a year or so after fleeing Austria, it now houses all of his relics and collections, left mostly as they were. In this video produced by the Tate, Colishaw tours several rooms in the house while talking about how his own work relates to the “dodgy” psychoanalytic practices that took place there. Hysteria, hypnosis, drugs, death, cigar smoke and naughty little boys (that’s a hint to check out the Duchovny link above – it’s not as random as you think), among other subjects, are discussed in the fascinating tapestry of past and present that Collishaw weaves as he walks through the house. Don’t forget to look for Freud’s super comfy-looking couch, pressed up against a wall in the study – it’s where all the magic happened.

Via Curated.

BOMB’s Series on the State of Abstraction Today

January 6, 2010 · Print This Article

Somehow I missed this series when it debuted at the end of November, but my trusty feedreader eventually makes sure the good stuff gets my attention. BOMB’s Jackie Saccoccio posed this question to twelve painters whom she admires: “What is the current state of abstraction?” The answers, provided by Dan Walsh and Amy Sillman, Jessica Dickinson and Philip Taafe, Steve DiBenedetto and Eric Wendel, Jason Fox and Eva Lundsager, and Carroll Dunham and Keltie Ferris, are as tonally varied, compelling, cheeky and angst-ridden as is, well, the state of abstraction today, I guess. (Amy Sillman uses the question as the opportunity to formally break up with Abstraction). Read all of the responses here. The last entry in the series, including responses from Marc Handelman and Cheryl Donegan, are coming up in a future installment.

Jessica Dickinson. HERE, 2008-2009, oil on limestone polymer on wood panel, 56 x 53 inches. Courtesy the artist and James Fuentes LLC, New York.

Bad at Sports: One Thousand Posts Strong & Still Going

January 4, 2010 · Print This Article

It’s been over four years, over 200 episodes, over 210 hours of audio, over 300 bottles of beer & now it’s over 1,000 posts on Art & Culture for Bad at Sports. Not only that but we’re just getting warmed up. More posts, more news, more reviews, more humor & more insight into this world of Art that we love by everyone from staff to guest writers and from art celebs to letters to the editor written by everyone that reads BaS.

There is more to come and you have more voice then ever to help direct the energy.

  • Want to have your voice heard? Write mail@badatsports.com and let us know what you think.
  • Don’t like to write or are illiterate like myself? We have a phone number you can call and speak your piece 312-772-2780.
  • You don’t write, speak or really get out of the house? Email us a illustration expressing your opinion on the current pedagogical discourse in the new millennium and it’s relation or lack there of to the larger commercial Art market both domestic and international and we will post your drawing on our white as a fridge website, Simon.

Basically at this point there is no reason not to contact us and help make this site better for you, the art world as a whole and even people who are just getting into & interested in the Arts since let’s get real we have all “slept together” enough and need to widen the scope a bit and enlarge the party some.

Happy New Year and lets take this recovering art economy out for a spin and build it better then before.

Thanks for reading Bad at Sports and as long as your here we will be as well.

Black Rain by Semiconductor

January 4, 2010 · Print This Article

Semiconductor, an artistic collaboration between the UK artists Ruth Jarman and Joe Gerhardt, have put together a three minute video titled Black Rain. It’s a compilation of heliospheric satellite images– as the artists describe it, “raw scientific satellite data which has not yet been cleaned and processed for public consumption” — that were taken during the NASA stereo solar mission, but it could easily pass for an early work of experimental film.

Black Rain from Semiconductor on Vimeo.

Via Blur and Sharpen.