Whitney Biennial Roundups

March 1, 2010 · Print This Article

Scott Short, Untitled (White), 2008. Oil on canvas.

Sharon Butler of the wonderful painting-centric blog Two Coats of Paint had a very helpful post a few days ago focusing on the painters included in this year’s Whitney Biennial. She also provides excerpts from the catalogue blurbs written about them. Go on over and check it out! Three painters from Chicago, Julia Fish, Scott Short, and Jim Lutes are featured in this year’s Biennial and are mentioned in Butler’s post.

Butler also includes some useful links to reviews of the Biennial by prominent art critics published thus far. My least favorite of those has got to be Charlie Finch’s “Thrift Shop Biennial” piece for artnet.com. Poor choice of metaphors in that review, methinks–and usually I’m able to take my snark with a huge helping of salt. Let’s leave the condition of homeless individuals out of our reviews of art shows, shall we?

A Historical Look at Olympic Pictograms

February 26, 2010 · Print This Article

The New York Times takes a look with Designer Steven Heller at the pictograms of the Olympics over the years. Some are works of art, others just work your patience.


Battleship Throw-Down – #Class @ Winkleman Gallery – Sunday!

February 26, 2010 · Print This Article

Ever feel like you wish you could take on painters in a one-on-one art debate!? NOW you can!!! Sink those battleships!! FIGHT FIGHT FIGHT!!! Embrace your inner art competitor!

Amanda Browder Plays Battleship to Win!
Join our own NYC Correspondant / Referee: Amanda Browder (possible recording) For an afternoon of Battleship gaming at the Winkleman Gallery where two groups go head to head in an art conversation battle.
Sunday, February 28, 2010 / 2pm / part of the William Powhida – Jennifer Dalton exhibition #Class
HOST : Amanda Browder – Bad at Sports Podcast – NYC Correspondent
Address: 637 West 27th Street, NYC – btw 11th and 12th

Battle One: Formalists vs. Conceptualists.

– Why do people still fetishize the object?
– Why can’t I buy a performance?
– Can we actually believe half the work that is out there?
– What has more value: objects or ideas?

Battle Two: Painters vs. The World.

– Are painters just magicians? or illusionists?
– Why do painters always make more money?
– Isn’t photography a better version of painting?
– Painting sucks…why?

Battle Three: Artist vs. Dealer

– Why can’t I believe in my dealer?
– Why are artists so fucked up?
– Dealers suck because they use the artist for their own advantage.
– Artists have no idea what is going on, they need handling.

All are welcome and encouraged to choose your weapon. At the end we will tally up the points and see who really reigns supreme. It’s a WAR ON THE SHORE!

It is possible if all works out that some of it might be recorded for Bad at Sports….also an open soap box for ranting.

Bring it Sailor!!!! – I double dog dare you!

Underfull Table Cloth by Kristine Bjaadal

February 25, 2010 · Print This Article


It seems the big talk coming out of the 2010 Stockholm Furniture Fair is the “Underfull Table Cloth” by Norwegian designer Kristine Bjaadal’s simple damask pattern table cloth with a twist.

Built into the table cloth is a layer with a separate pattern and absorption level so that when a colored liquid is spilled the hidden design (in this case a butterfly pattern) shows through in line with the spill mark. The item is looking for a production agreement but the possibilities are endless and it’s pretty original for a product over 2000 years old.



Off-Topic | Randall Szott

February 25, 2010 · Print This Article

Off-Topic invites artists, curators, writers, and cultural workers to discuss a subject not directly related to the practice of making art. We would like to welcome Randall Szott as our latest guest with his post, “More Tailgating, Less Curating”. In his own words, Randall  “has described himself as a chef, a merchant marine, or a schmuck with some blogs.” When not spending part of his time at sea, Randall can be found at He Said, She Said.

More Tailgating, Less Curating

Randall Szott

I’m a cook. When I tell people this there are no quizzical looks or sheepish follow up questions. People get it and want to hear more. Sometimes the fact that I have two grad degrees in art makes its way into the conversation and things get awkward. This, to me is a problem, a fundamental problem that I’ve been invited to say a bit about here at BaS. What follows is my highly anecdotal account of why I believe the art world should strive to be more like the culinary world. It is rooted in my experience and obviously suffused with my values. If you don’t share those values (pluralism, flexibility, openness, egalitarianism, inclusiveness, conviviality, approachability, diversity, etc.), find those values misapplied or irrelevant to the context, or if you have had a radically different experience with the art or culinary world then obviously this account will be of questionable value to you. I am talking about the capital A art world – the one that BaS almost exclusively engages itself with – not the immensely diverse “real” art world of sidewalk art fairs, church craft shows, potters in Memphis, painters in Sedona, and the multiplicity of creative artists that work outside the “recognition” of the network of biennials, jet-set curators, international journals, art historians, big city newspapers, and elite colleges/universities. [Read more]