Top 5 Picks! (3/19 & 3/20)

March 18, 2010 · Print This Article

Oh, may darling lovelies, I will miss you all this weekend. I must leave you to travel north for the weekend. Friday night will find me sitting in a cabin on the edge of a lake, drinking rum and trying to figure out how to not loose at poker. It will be good, and I so dearly need it. But, I am not leaving you with nothing. Though I’ve been looking forward to this trip for a while now, I am bummed about the line-up I’m going to be missing this weekend, for it is a good one. Before I go on to the list, I did want to mention one thing. My friend Laura Shaeffer (of Home Gallery) is running the second iteration of the Op-Shop down in Hyde Park and is looking for proposals for the space. It is an old Hollywood Video with, I shit you not, the CREEPIEST FUCKING BASEMENT in the whole of time. Want to make some crazy site specific art ASAP? Proposals are due by Saturday! And now, for the list…

1. WTF 1.0 at Kunz, Vis, Gonzalez

And I quote, “KVG cordially invites you to attend the opening of WTF 1.0 curated by Rosalinda March 19th 2010 from 6-10pm at 2324 Montana Chicago, IL. WTF is a Kunz, Vis, González exhibition series introducing the viewer to contemporary ideas on the cult of  ‘new and youth.’  WTF uses humor and the absurd in visual art to delight the viewer and create a reflexive lens in which to view radical shifts in cultural perspectives.” Can’t argue with anyone who calls an art show WTF. Perhaps my next show will be called FUBAR, or possibly BOHICA.

Kunz, Vis, González is located at 2324 W. Montana St., in the garage. The reception is Friday from 6-10pm.

2. Irena Knezevic: Gesture Guild at Threewalls

And I quote, “The League of Dark Departments have joined forces in the Gesture Guild, a bureau for the recovery and acquisition of lost gestures. The Gesture Guild aims to return and reinforce the primordial anxieties responsible for head-bending weight and other liquid spiraling disasters, topical and tropical.” Oh and I love the editors note: Sailor attire is strongly encouraged, those who do not arrive as sailors will be made into sailors.

Threewalls is located at 119 N. Peoria St, #2C. The reception is Friday from 6-9pm, performance begins at 7pm.

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The Post Family Presents “Get It Together Again” at Chicago Tourism Center Gallery

March 17, 2010 · Print This Article

Get out your scissors and glue: Chad Kouri of the Post Family and Ed Marszewski of Co-Prosperity Sphere are unveiling a new incarnation of last summer’s “Get It Together” exhibition – it opens this Friday, March 19 from 5-7 and it sounds like so much fun! Full details below; make sure to scroll down to the bottom for a really beautiful video of last summer’s “Get It Together” event. I love all the Chicago art hipsters sitting around, totally engrossed in their cutting and pasting, just like scrapbookin’ mamas!! Super sweet.

After the success of “Get It Together” in July 2009 at Co-Prosperity Sphere we are running the show again at Chicago Tourism Center Gallery with an extended lineup as well as new work from our old friends.

“Get it Together Again,” is an exhibition of assemblage, collage, and collaborative work by local, national, and international artists. Organized by Chad Kouri of the Post Family and Ed Marszewski of Co-Prosperity Sphere, the exhibition includes over 25 works on paper, mixed media, and installations including a grocery store with hand drawn products made out of paper. Gallery visitors of all ages can sit down at a collage table and create their own work. Materials such as magazines, scissors and glue will be provided or bring your own.

The Show includes works by: Adrianne Goodrich, Alex Valentine, Anthony Zinonos, Ben Speckmann, Chris Roberson, Chris Schreck, Doug Shaeffer, Emily Clayton, Greg Lamarche, Hisham Akira Bharoocha, James Harry Ewert Jr, Joe Tallarico, Jordan Martins, Mario Wagner, Matt Nichols, Matthew Rich, Michael Pajon, Netherland, Peter Skvara, Richard Smith, Rod Hunting, Ron Ewert, Ryan Duggan, Sarah Jeziorski, Scott Massey, Stephen Eichhorn, and Tom Torluemke.

Chicago Tourism Center Gallery
72 E. Randolph Street
Opening reception March 19th, 5 – 7pm

Show runs March 19 – April 6, 2010
Thursday, March 25 at 12:15pm, artist talk
Thursday, April 1 at 12:15pm, hands on collage workshop

HOURS: Monday to Thursday, 8am – 7pm; Friday, 8am to 6pm; Saturday, 9am -6pm;
and Sunday, 10am – 6pm. Admission to the gallery and exhibition events is free.

Get It Together from LanjersOaken on Vimeo.

Gagosian’s Upcoming Ed Paschke Exhibition Is Not About Jeff Koons.

March 17, 2010 · Print This Article

Ed Paschke, Pink Lady, 1970. Oil on canvas.

Meg emailed me about this forthcoming Ed Paschke exhibition, curated by Jeff Koons, a few months ago. I can’t remember if WTF?? was actually stated in the email or just implied, but we both kind of rolled our eyes and thought, whatever. I replied that the Koons curation part maybe wasn’t so bad — Koons was Paschke’s assistant, after all, and Koons has often expressed his admiration for Paschke, who died in 2004 (see the MCA Chicago’s 2008 exhibition “Everything’s Here” for one example).  But this morning I noticed the following Tweet: “Jeff Koons gets a second chance: his show of former employer Paschke’s work @Gagosian opens Thursday.” Ugh. It more than sucks that this exhibition of Paschke’s work, which no doubt will rock the house, is already being framed as some kind of Jeff Koons extravaganza. Or even worse, as Koons’ chance at redemption, a way to show that he does, indeed, have some fragment of a soul.

Luckily, the Gagosian Gallery itself has thus far refused to improperly hype this show (other than by having Jeff Koons curate it in the first place, some might argue). But the gallery’s press release is comprehensive and focused. At the top, the text notes that Koons worked as Paschke’s studio assistant in Chicago in the mid-1970s while the former was attending the School of the Art Institute. A line or two follows about Koons’ admiration for Paschke. But the rest of the two-page text is devoted to Paschke himself, as it should be. It’s a very well-written  release, so I don’t feel the need to paraphrase. A couple of excerpts:

“Born in Chicago in 1939, Paschke studied at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago during the
height of the Imagist movement in the late fifties, while supporting himself as a commercial
artist. He avidly collected photograph-related visual media in all its forms, from newspapers,
magazines, and posters to film, television, and video, with a preference for imagery that tended
toward the risqué and the marginal. Through this he studied the ways in which these media
transformed and stylized the experience of reality, which in turn impacted on his consideration
of formal and philosophical questions concerning veracity and invention in his own painting. At
the same time, he sought living and working situations — from factory hand to psychiatric aide –
– that would connect him with Chicago’s diverse ethnic communities as well as feed his
fascination for gritty urban life and human abnormality. Thus he developed a distinctive oeuvre
that oscillated between personal and aesthetic introspection and confronting social and cultural


“Unlike most of his Pop predecessors with their unthreatening embrace of popular culture,
Paschke gravitated towards the images that exemplified the underside of American values —
fame, violence, sex, and money – a preference that he shared with Andy Warhol, who was one
of his foremost inspirations. Although long considered to be an artist of his own time and place,
his explorations of the archetypes and clichés of media identity prefigured the appropriative
gestures of the “Pictures Generation,” and for a new generation of global artists his totemic,
eye-popping paintings have come to embody the essence of cosmopolitan art.”

A fully illustrated catalogue is being published in conjunction with the exhibition, with essays by Koons (natch), Dave Hickey, and reprints of significant texts on the artist by Richard Flood and Dennis Adrian. And presented concurrently here in Chicago will be a survey show titlted “Ed Paschke’s Women” from March 26 through May 22, 2010, at Russell Bowman Art Advisory.

Paschke is a well-known figure to art historians in Chicago and the Midwest, but he certainly never attained star status by anyone’s measure. No doubt it’ll be tempting for NY critics to try and frame Paschke’s work in terms of Koons, or better yet, to frame the latter’s work in terms of the former. But I hope those who see Paschke’s Gagosian show will resist this temptation and instead take his work at face value, as it were, without politicizing it or using it as an opportunity to disguise the fact that the artist they really want to write about is Jeff Koons (again….yawn.). It’s a shame that this show risks being framed via the hand that Jeff Koons has played in “presenting” it, but make no mistake: this is an Ed Paschke show, and from its outlines, at least, it promises to be a fairly significant one.

Ed Paschke, Cocco, 2002 Ink and colored pencil on paper. Russell Bowman Art Advisory

Ed Paschke, Au Voleur, 1991 Oil on linen. Russell Bowman Art Advisory.

Help Amanda Browder and North Brooklyn Public Art Coalition Make ‘Future Phenomena’!

March 17, 2010 · Print This Article

Hey all, Bad at Sportswoman and Brooklyn-based artist Amanda Browder, along with the North Brooklyn Public Art Coalition (NbPac) are in the process of constructing Future Phenomena, Browder’s temporary public art project sponsored by NbPac and the Brooklyn Arts Council. The goal is to create a fabric public art sculpture on the facade of a building in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, NY. In her description of the project, Amanda notes that “Greenpoint and Williamsburg are at the center of the current transformation of our economic life from mass consumption, with its end product of ever more degraded earth, water, and air, to one based on feedback, reuse, recycling…mass re-consumption. Greenpoint (bordered on the north by a waterway so polluted that it has rendered state and local governments catatonic) and Williamsburg are century-long experiments in the sustainability of urban life.

“The public display of art is a critical element in generating and focusing neighborhood responses of the realities of gentrification, ancient toxic waterways, and urban migration.  Public art can bring life and awareness to static architectural objects but the “Future Phenomena” will be not only a spectacle of bright colors and flowing shapes, but also a social space for pedestrians, participants and residents.  Into this space will flow work, materials, comments, all manner of human energy, to be recycled until the project vanishes, leaving behind a memory of the power of art to transform the mundane.”

If you live in the NYC area, you can help bring this immense, sewn artwork to life at three NbPac-hosted COMMUNITY SEWING DAYS. All of the details provided directly from the source can be found below….

Saturday, March 27th

St. Cecilia’s Convent (with Round Robin)

21 Monitor Street, Greenpoint, Brooklyn


Sunday, April 18th

Lutheran Church of the Messiah

129 Russell Street, Greenpoint, Brooklyn


Saturday, May 1st

St. Ann and Holy Trinity Church

157 Montague Street, Bushwick, Brooklyn


DONATE -  Contribute your unused fabric to help make the piece! We are covering a building and we need a lot of materials! Looking for cotton, sheets, pants, and non-stretchy fabric, and sewing tools such as needles, thread, and scissors. We are also seeking to borrow sewing machines for just one day or donations of machines for the project. For questions or to arrange donations, send an email to with ”NbPac” in the subject header.

CUT – Help cut fabric to form the chevron shape which will make a true spectacle!

SEW -  Help sew with easy straight stiches on a sewing machine (tutoring available!) to physically bind the donated fabrics into it’s awesome shape.

CONVERSE – Help cheer on people working, make new friends and meet other community members, learn and collaborate

It will be a fun day of volunteerism and artmaking!  Bring your craft-loving family members and friends!

Future Phenomena will be installed in Greenpoint, Brooklyn in Spring 2010.  To learn more about this project, visit:

Project sketch for "Future Phenonemon"

Amanda politely demands the shirt off this fella's back.

Tuesday’s Video Pick | Artist’s Soap Box Derby

March 16, 2010 · Print This Article

The Incredible San Fancisco Artists’ Soapbox Derby, 1975. from Mike Haeg on Vimeo. (via Swissmiss)