Episode 103: Carol Becker

August 19, 2007 · Print This Article

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Duncan and Terri talk to Carol Becker about the School of the Art Institute, the future of arts education, and her new position at Columbia University.

ALSO: THE INCREDIBLE RETURN OF MIKE AND THE 30 SECONDS MOVIE REVIEWS with bonus seconds.

Dean of Faculty and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

She is the author of numerous articles and several books with many foreign editors. Her book publications include: The Invisible Drama: Women and The Anxiety of Change; The Subversive Imagination: Artists, Society, and Social Responsibility; Zones of Contention: Essays on Art, Institutions, Gender, and Anxiety; and most recently, Surpassing the Spectacle: Global Transformations and the Changing Politics of Art.

Prelude to published interview taken from the book, Conversations Before the End of Time by Suzi Gablik.
“In 1994, Carol Becker was appointed dean and vice-president for academic affairs of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, having been a former chair of the graduate division before that. She received her Ph.D. in literature at the University of San Diego, where she was a protégé of Herbert Marcuse. A lecturer in women’s studies since the late 1960s, and a writer on psychoanalytic theory and cultural politics, she has been mulling over the obsolete attitudes and strategies of the art world for a long time, particularly the issue of the artist’s responsibility to society, which she claims is a sensitive issue that makes everyone uncomfortable, defensive and insecure. Becker feels that many artists simply refuse to address the issue at all. Artists often choose rebellion, which alienates them from their audience, and then become angry at the degree to which they are unappreciated. In part this is a consequence of the way we educate students in art schools, envisioning the artist as a marginalized and romantic figure who, she claims, operates “out of what Freud calls the Pleasure Principle while the rest of us struggle within the Reality Principle.” Students need to think about their work, she feels, not in isolation, but in relationship to the public and to an audience that has not been addressed in art school pedagogical situations. American art students, like most American college students, Becker claims, have not been trained to think globally or politically about their position in society. In a sense, art has seceded from American culture so completely that it has lost its effectiveness and become a subsidized bureaucracy of self-serving specialists.”
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Episode 102: There’s a riot going on

August 12, 2007 · Print This Article

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This week’s show has everything.

Brian and Marc with critic, writer, and all around interesting guy Julian Myers on rock and rioting.

Julian Myers is a San Francisco-based writer and art historian. His writings have been featured in publications such Frieze, October, Afterall, and a number of local and national museum and gallery catalogs. In addition, Myers teaches at the Curatorial Practice program at California College of Arts, the San Francisco Art Institute, and the University of California at Santa Cruz.

Terri, Joanna and Danielle Egan Miller talk to Arik Verezhensky proprietor of Gemini Fine Books & Arts, Ltd. A collector and dealer in rare and amazing art and books, and art books, and maybe a few books on art. To top it all off the show wraps up with some obscure Japanese Hip-Hop, Richard’s new favorite genre of music.
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Episode 101: Jim Duignan/ Stockyard Institute

August 5, 2007 · Print This Article

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AMANDA IS BACK!!! Duncan and Amanda talk to Jim Duignan about his current project at the Hyde Park Art Center. Super friend of Bad at Sports (and Director of Exhibitions at the HPAC) Allison Peters is there too!

To wit:

“Jim Duignan is an artist and founder of the Stockyard Institute, a project that draws attention to the visionary status of youth and people through the arts in a variety of Chicago neighborhoods. Stockyard Institute publishes AREA Chicago Arts, Education, Activism, a biannual publication in Chicago

Jim begins his “residency” at the Art Center in preparation for Pedagogical Factory, an exhibition at the Art Center in Gallery 1, opening this summer. He’ll be at the Art Center on Thursdays in the Second Floor Studios on the west side of the building. Stop in for a chat with Jim to find out more about his project!”

…music and passion are always in fashion….
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Episode 100: Mattress Factory/ Book Review

July 28, 2007 · Print This Article

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Richard joins Pittsburgh bureau chiefs Katie Reilly and Craig Fox along with special correspondent Sarah Guernsey to discuss the Mattress Factory.

Also Terri and Joanna discuss Don DeLillo’s latest Falling Man: A Novel.

100 shows. Wow.

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Episode 99: Center for Tactical Magic/ Caroline Picard

July 22, 2007 · Print This Article

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Joanna, Amanda and Terri talk to Green Lantern Director Caroline Picard.
Marc and Brian talk to the Aaron Gach of the Center for Tactical Magic in San Francisco.

Richard continues his slide into “Ed Asner”dom.

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