Episode 126: Meszmer/Müller and Book Review

January 27, 2008 · Print This Article

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The Central European Bureau, “EuroShark” Mark Staff Brandl and his new partner Lamis El Farra interview Alex Meszmer of the art team Meszmer/Müller.

Meszmer discusses the exhibition they curated at Projektraum Exex titled “Deconstructing Eden – Fragments of a Perfect Life,” their transitory museum-in-progress called Zeitgarten, the Swiss professional artists’ organization Visarte, and the new group of highly active “alternative” art spaces in Switzerland united under the rubric “Off-Off.”

Terri and Joanna give their book review of Eeee Eee Eeeee by Tao Lin . The “shitty drawing of novels.”

Duncan rages about how F-ing angry he is at the Art Institute of Chicago, and in order to make up for it, rumor has it that he intends to increase his donation to them. If you work in development, please make a note of Duncan’s generosity and contact me at badatsports@gmail.com and I’ll pass along his phone number. He really wants to talk to you ASAP.

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Episode 125: Tim Fleming/Art Reviews

January 20, 2008 · Print This Article

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Tim Fleming

100 minutes of raw power! Brian and Marc talk to Tim Fleming, Director of Art LA. If that weren’t enough for a whole show, we go that extra mile and knock your socks off!!!

Lori Waxman and Duncan check out the current batch of shows around the West Loop. Did they review your show, oh yes they did, you’d better listen.
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Episode 124: Laura Letinsky/ Sabrina Raaf

January 13, 2008 · Print This Article

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FIRST: Duncan and Jeff Ward talk to photographer Laura Letinsky about her work and recent exhibition at Monique Meloche.

Laura Letinsky has exhibited her color photographs in numerous venues, including the Museum of Modern Art, New York City; Casino Luxembourg; The Nederlands Foto Institute; the Canadian Museum of Contemporary Photography, Ottawa; and the Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago. Her series of still-life photographs, Morning, and Melancholia, has been shown at Edwynn Houk Gallery, New York City, Copia, Napa Valley, and Stephen Bulger Gallery, Toronto. More recent and upcoming exhibitions include Time Was Away at the Art Institute of Chicago, I did not remember I had forgotten at the Monique Meloche Gallery, Chicago, and Hardly More Than Ever at the University of Chicago’s Renaissance Society and the Shine Gallery in London. Her work is collected by LaSalle Bank Photography Collection; Yale University Art Gallery; the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; the Art Institute of Chicago; the Museum of Fine Art, Houston; and the San Francisco Museum of Art. Letinsky received her B.F.A. from the University of Manitoba in 1986 and her M.F.A. from Yale University 1991.

NEXT: Kathryn Born talks to sculptor Sabrina Raaf.

Sabrina Raaf is a Chicago-based artist working in experimental sculptural media and photography. Her work has been presented in solo and group exhibitions at Mejan Labs (Stockholm), Stefan Stux Gallery (NYC), Ars Electronica (Linz), Opel Villas Foundation Art Center (Rüsselsheim), Museum Tinguely (Basel), Espace Landowski (Paris), Artbots 2005 (Dublin), San Jose Museum of Art, Kunsthaus Graz, ISEA (Helsinki), Klein Art Works (Chicago), The Lab (San Francisco) and Painted Bride Center (Philadelphia). She is the recipient of a Creative Capital Grant in Emerging Fields (2002) and an Illinois Arts Council Fellowship (2005 & 2001). Reviews of her work have appeared in Art in America, Contemporary, Chicago Tribune Sunday Magazine, Leonardo, www.lab71.org, The Washington Post, and New Art Examiner. She received an MFA in Art and Technology from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (1999) and is currently Assistant Professor in the School of Art and Design at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

The music in this week’s show is in honor of Duncan and the shady company he has been keeping.
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Episode 123: Anne Elizabeth Moore

January 6, 2008 · Print This Article

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Anne Elizabeth Moore

Duncan and Terri talk to Anne Elizabeth Moore about her book Unmarketable: Brandalism, Copyfighting, Mocketing, and the Erosion of Integrity and related topics.

For years the do-it-yourself (DIY)/punk underground has worked against the logic of mass production and creative uniformity, disseminating radical ideas and directly making and trading goods and services. But what happens when the underground becomes just another market? What happens when the very tools that the artists and activists have used to build word of mouth are co-opted by corporate America? What happens to cultural resistance when it becomes just another marketing platform?

Unmarketable examines the corrosive effects of corporate infiltration of the underground. Activist and author Anne Elizabeth Moore takes a critical look at the savvy advertising agencies, corporate marketing teams, and branding experts who use DIY techniques to reach a youth market—and at members of the underground who have helped forward corporate agendas through their own artistic, and occasionally activist, projects.

Covering everything from Adbusters to Tylenol’s indie-star-studded Ouch! campaign, Unmarketable is a lively, funny, and much-needed look at what’s happening to the underground and what it means for activism, commerce, and integrity in a world dominated by corporations.

Anne Elizabeth Moore is the co-editor of Punk Planet, the Best American Comics series editor, and the author of Hey Kidz! Buy This Book: A Radical Primer on Corporate and Governmental Propaganda and Artistic Activism for Short People. She has written for Bitch, the Chicago Reader, In These Times, The Onion, The Progressive, and Chicago Public Radio WBEZ’s radio program 848. She lives in Chicago.

I will mail 5 bucks to the first person who can identify the name of the artist and title of the song used to close the show, it has bothered me for years that I don’t know who it is.

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Episode 122: Leo Koenig/ BioTechnique

December 30, 2007 · Print This Article

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First: Amanda Browder and guest host Tom Sanford talk to New York Gallerist Leo Koenig.

From the Leo Koenig Site:
Leo Koenig opened his gallery in 1999 in Williamsburg, Brooklyn. There, he presented both promising young talent and established, historically significant artists. Within a year, the gallery moved to Manhattan, first to a space in Tribeca, then to Centre street in soho, where we were for 4 years. In August 2005, we opened our new ground floor space at 545 West 23rd Street in the heart of Chelsea.

For six years now, Leo Koenig Inc. has been presenting a surprising mix of fresh exhibitions, anchored by a well-learned tradition of publication. Ever vigilant that the artist’s work be seen in an appropriate context, the gallery has been dedicated to producing catalogues with penetrating essays, and limited-edition artist books.

With a focus on painting and sculpture, Leo Koenig Inc.’s current roster includes some of the most internationally renowned emerging and mid-career contemporary artists.

Next: Brian Andrews, Marc LeBlanc and Patricia Maloney discuss the BioTechnique show at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, which Brian Andrews thinks is utter crap.
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