Rebus Issue # 4 and Matthew Bowman

December 12, 2009 · Print This Article

 

The New Issue of Rebus is out! For those of you who don’t know but ought to, Rebus is an online journal of art history and theory organized and published by doctoral students out of the University of Essex, UK.  I’ve been a fan of Rebus since I was first made aware of it last spring.  I was struck by the straightforward agenda of sharing ideas. Which, under normal circumstances, are rarely read or disseminated much beyond their academic system.  To a certain extent I think Rebus mediates the gaps between those dust-collecting hardbound dissertations lining the shelves of collegiate libraries next to the esoteric journals published within any field of study which a requisite level of specificity to necessitate doctoral study and the casual contemporary art writing consumer. Put another way, I dig the accessibility of this journal.  So Rebus issue 4 is hot off the presses and is edited by Dr. Matthew Bowman and Dr. Stephen Moonie.  I’ve been so very lucky, as Dr. Bowman agreed to my idea that he share some of his thoughts on the journal and on his specific interests within the scope of critical theory. I particularly enjoy his interest in time as an under investigated element in art history, theory and criticism, most probably to do with my own personal interest in mitigated meaning and ways of understanding experience. Check out the new issue

 http://www.essex.ac.uk/arthistory/rebus/issue4.htm 

 

The following is a short, simple and earnest interview with Dr. Matthew Bowman.

JG- Would you share a bit about yourself for our lovely readers, for introductions?

Photobucket MB-I originally completed my degree in fine art, but soon comprehended my preference was to write about art rather than produce my own. I wrote my MA dissertation on Marcel Duchamp’s Fountain, arguing that its processes of reproduction functioned as open-ended conditions of displacement which are immanently temporal, a manifestation of Duchamp’s fascination with “delay.” My PhD research took a different tack, analyzing the October journal. I focused mostly upon the journal’s early years (1976-1981), years which virtually transformed the face of art-critical discourse. Rather than give a straightforward historical account of October, however, I elected to argue that the journal in those years fundamentally reconfigures our comprehension of medium-specificity by pointing to the way artworks, especially after “the crux of minimalism,” reinvent the medium. Of course, early October perceives itself as rejecting the question of medium-specificity as a modernist issue, but I contend there are resources within October that encourage us to reconsider what a medium is, and how it operates within an expanded field. I completed my dissertation October and the Expanded Field of Art and Criticism in 2008. At present I’m lecturing part-time in contextual studies at Colchester Institute, and working in the History of Art department as well as Arts on 5 at the University of Essex. Between these activities I co-edit Rebus: A Journal of Art History and Theory.

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On Sundrun

December 7, 2009 · Print This Article

 

This Wednesday evening is the opening reception for Matthew Paul Jinks’ exhibition On Sundrun at Gallery 400.  Matthew Paul Jinks’ work consistently deals with issues of memory, ritual, and inherited identity.  Personal and cultural identity enacted, passed on, shared, re-enacted.  On Sundrun addresses identity relationships of English, Indian, and Pakistani individuals as postcolonial cultural representatives through an evolving game spontaneously elaborated on cricket.  Jinks’ exhibition On Sundrun includes sculpture, film, sound installation and a performance in the gallery space.  Jinks explores cricket as an enactment of the mythology of cultural identity exploring the effects of assimilation. When speaking to his work as a Photobucketwhole Jinks says, “My work performs culture and collects memory.  My installations, videos and performances appropriate and de-regulate social and historical constructs: self, nation, history. I use image and language as formal stand-ins for the latent territories that underlie these constructs and the thresholds that link them.”  I think this exhibition will be an exceptional experience that continues Jinks’ project of providing a platform for discussion and experience that fosters the ideological possibility for reconciliation through humor, engagement, and cultural iconological tradition. 

Jinks graduated his undergrad in 2005 from The Glasgow School of Art in Scotland, U.K. Since completing his MFA as a University Fellow at the University of Illinois at Chicago in 2008, Jinks has exhibited in the U.K and the U.S., most recently at the Green Lantern Gallery and the Hyde Park Art Center, here in Chicago.

Upcoming Exhibition:
On Sundrun 
December 8, 2009 –January 16, 2010
Reception: Wednesday, December 9, 5-8 pm
[Please note Gallery 400 will be closed for Winter Break: Thurs., Dec. 24 –
Mon., Jan. 4]

Related Event:
Artist Talk: Saturday, December 12, 2:00 pm

Useful Links 

http://www.mathewpauljinks.com/



http://www.uic.edu/aa/college/gallery400/





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e-flux/journal #10

November 20, 2009 · Print This Article

The new issue of e-flux/journal is up online and I am giddy over it.  This is their tenth episode as the journal, which makes it nearly a year old, as they publish monthly. Though the journal is a relatively new application of the e-flux program, e-flux.com has been around since January 1999 beginning with an email announcement about a small exhibition in a e-flux/journal #10Chinatown Holiday Inn hotel room.  A decade later e-flux is still based out of New York with far reaching out posts in Berlin, and the corneal receptors at the far end of the yawning, immeasurable distance that is the internet.  Today this network includes over 50,000 visual art professionals.  E-flux is one of my favorite contemporary art journals, it is edited by Julieta Aranda, Brian Kuan Wood and Anton Vidokle if you are at all unfamiliar with it I urge you to take some time to get to know their project. Whether the journal or one of their many educational and collaborative projects there’s bound to be something that moves you, it changed my life.  Testimonials aside, e-flux/journal #10 this month discusses the limits to which the democratization of image production can become a tool for making versus being at home in the world.  With essays from Sherif El-Azma The Psychogeography of Loose Associations, Luis Camnitzer, ALPHABETIZATION, Part Two: Hegemonic Language and Arbitrary Order, Paul Chan What Art Is and Where it Belongs, Céline Condorelli Life Always Escapes, Peter Friedl Secret Modernity, Hans Ulrich Obrist Ever Spero, and Hito Steyerl In Defense of the Poor Image. E-flux/journal #10, hot off the presses!

http://www.e-flux.com/journal/issue/10

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