Cy Twombly gets paid for the kiss of death

November 18, 2007 · Print This Article

Rindy Sam, the 20 year old Cambodian artist living in France that was in the news back in July has had her day in court and the judge has fined her accordingly:

1euro goes to Cy Twombly for symbolic reasons

1,000 euros ($1,425) to the painting’s owner

486 euros ($713) to the Avignon gallery where she planted the kiss

Also 100 hours of community service after convicting her of “voluntarily damaging a work of art.”

$2,139 in damages was far below the $2.8 million in damages the owner Yvon Lambert had originally requested — the full value of the painting.

He claimed it cost more than $45,000 to restore the work because the lipstick could not be easily removed.

During the trial, Sam stated continuously: “When I kissed it, I thought the artist would have understood,”

Cy Twombly has yet to comment……….

Episode 115: Judy Ledgerwood with guest host Tony Tasset

November 11, 2007 · Print This Article

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Holy crap! This show is an instant classic. Richard returns; not only to production duty but also, at long last, to interview duty. Painter and art legend Judy Ledgerwood is our guest. Guest host Tony Tasset joins in on interviewing duties to ask the hard hitting questions. Not to be missed.

The following bio is shamelessly stolen from the Hyde Park Art Center, please don’t sue us:

In the tradition of Modernist painting, Judy Ledgerwood paints monumental abstract compositions that explore light, color, and structure. Her paintings are formal, decorative, and tranquil while simultaneously being highly personal, optically challenging, and inherently subversive. In her compositions, she creates a dialogue that is uniquely feminine but also powerful and authoritative. Early in her career, Ledgerwood began incorporating traditionally feminine pastel colors into her landscape based paintings in an attempt to challenge and undermine the historically male-dominated tradition of gestural abstract paintings. Today her compositions include circular motifs typically associated with the decorative arts tradition. In the 1970s many feminist artists identified and celebrated circular patterns as being connected to female identity. Ledgerwood acknowledges this tradition through her continued use of dot motifs, which she identifies as her form of non exclamatory mark-making. Ledgerwood is the recipient of a Tiffany Award in the Visual Arts, a National Endowment for the Arts Award, an Illinois Art Council Award and two CIRA Grants from Northwestern University. Her work is represented in the public collections of the Art Institute of Chicago, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Milwaukee Museum of Art, the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, and Swissbank New York. Her degrees are from the Art Academy of Cincinnati, BFA, and the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, MFA.

If that weren’t enough, crack open a diet coke plus and sit down for Mike Benedetto who is joined by Tony Fitzpatrick as they review the new Jodi Foster Revenge thriller The Brave One during which they use the phrase “Charles Bronson with tits”.

And for you Encyclopedia Brown sleuths out there, allegedly there is a secret message from Tony Tasset hidden somewhere in the show.

If you listen to one freaking episode of BAS this year it sure as hell better be this one.
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Episode 114: Carol Jackson, Anthony Elms, and Jubilee City

November 4, 2007 · Print This Article

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On this week’s exciting Episode, number 114… Art Forum’s Anthony Elms and Bad at Sports’ Duncan MacKenzie interrogate Carol Jackson about her dynamite exhibition at Gallery 400, and Terri Griffith and Joanna MacKenzie take apart John Andoe’s “Jubilee City: A Memoir at Full Speed”. It doesn’t get any better then this.

Also, to the person who scrawled “I MISS RICHARD” in lipstick on the mirror of the men’s bathroom at BAS HQ, we know who you are and this is unacceptable behavior.

From Gallery 400:
Carol Jackson’s signs, sculptures, gouaches and drawings use common, everyday “signatureless” styles to let loose the grandiose morality within the picturesque languages and visuals of advertising. Her work is a bitterly humorous send up of the demands and promises commercial representations make for goods, be they detergent, food, or real estate. Long focusing on a series of meticulously hand-tooled leather reworkings of both store advertising and real estate development signage, Jackson replaces the found text with disdainful, mistrustful and self-depreciating thoughts that sales language represses. What remains is the epic longing and promissory nature of the address.

From Publishers Weekly:
n this charming memoir, Andoe narrates his journey from his Tulsa childhood through redneck, hard-partying teen years to a highly successful career as a (hard-partying redneck) painter in New York City. While Andoe may not be a professional writer, his humor and offbeat artistic sensibility make up for any lack of prose-writing chops. Through discrete anecdotes that seldom run longer than two pages, Andoe assembles vivid portraits of his family and friends and of the various environments he inhabited—the working-class Tulsa neighborhoods of the 1960s, the high school and college drug culture at the end of the hippie era, and the New York art scene of the 1980s. Andoe rarely said No to drugs, and the marginal characters and dangerous encounters of the lowlife provide the book with a great deal of energy and pathos; at times his memoir reads like a more amateur version of Denis Johnson’s Jesus’ Son. Yet whenever the gonzo stories verge on tedium, Andoe modulates his tone and shows himself as the stay-at-home dad, the outdoorsman, the artist. While Andoe has an occasional tendency to settle scores (his ex-wife receives particularly brutal treatment) or trumpet his status as an outsider, for the most part his wide-eyed sense of wonder and keen observations make the everyday strange and fresh. (Aug.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Episode 113: Tracy Marie Taylor/ Front Forty Press

October 28, 2007 · Print This Article

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Duncan and Richard talk to Tracy Marie Taylor, artist and curator who curated the new show Bilingual, Art at the Intersection of Painting and Video.

Bilingual focuses on artwork at the intersection of painting and drawing, film and video, encompassing both conceptual and process-driven approaches. The artists in this exhibition are acting as visual linguists or interpreters, breaking down one language and reconstructing it in another, holding the sense of the structure together with an understanding of both.

Bilingual will feature works by Shira Avni, Kylie Baker, Wafaa Bilal, Jeremy Blake, Eddy De Vos, Terence Hannum, Jay Heikes, John Hiltabidel & John Grant, Jo Jackson, William Kentridge, Patte Loper, Joshua Mosley, Sabina Ott, David Reed, Peter Rostovsky, Alison Ruttan, Jason Salavon, Marcelino Stuhmer, Fraser Taylor, Jim Trainor, and Scott Wolniak.

Joanna and Terri talk to Doug Fogelson from Front Forty Press about art books and lots of other neat stuff. Front Forty Press is a small publisher focused on artistic projects. A Front Forty project is one that embodies uninhibited creativity and deals with current topics. The work can be functional, political, ecological or simply expressive. What matters most at Front Forty Press is the cultivation and communication of ideas.
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How to write Australian Political Ads

October 27, 2007 · Print This Article