Glich-y Delay

June 13, 2011 · Print This Article

Dear Internet,

Bad at Sports were delayed in posting this weeks show. The delay was directly related to a tech issue between us and our media server Libsyn.  We are working to correct this concern.

Do not write us about this.  We know and we are working to fix stuff.

 

We love you and need you,

Bad at Sports.

Can you dig it!

June 9, 2011 · Print This Article

Bad at Sports contributors have events coming up this Friday and next Friday.

THIS WEEK.
If you are in NEW YORK…

RESIDENT CONVERSATION

Fri, June 10:
6:30 pm at
apexart

Li Mu, current Inbound Resident from Shanghai, China, will be in conversation with Bad at Sport’s New York correspondent Amanda Browder.

They will discuss his time over the past month in New York, what influence the city has had, and how it differs from his native China.

http://apexart.org/events/limu.php

NEXT WEEK.
If you are in CHICAGO…

Contributor/upcoming guest Lori Waxman and Maud Lavin (also an upcoming guest) are doing a reading…

Girls! Girls! Girls! In Contemporary Art

Since the 1990s, a bourgeoning field of female artists have produced challenging, critically debated, and avidly collected artworks depicting female adolescence. Girls! Girls! Girls! presents essays from established and up-and-coming scholars who examine the impact of this collective outpouring, through themes such as nostalgia, narcissism, post-feminism, and fantasy. Tonight, join co-editor Lori Waxman, and contributor, Maud Lavin – both professors at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago – for a discussion of this groundbreaking scholarship.

06/17/2011 7:30 pm
Women & Children First
5233 N. Clark St.
Chicago, IL

http://www.womenandchildrenfirst.com/event/lori-waxman-co-editor-maud-lavin-contributor

Thank You, Kathryn.

November 9, 2010 · Print This Article

Kathryn Hixson

It is tough to say goodbye to my teacher and my friend, Kathryn Hixson. I’m sure that it is tough for a lot of us here, whether we were friends of Kathryn’s, former or current students, or one of the thousands who have been impacted by her work as a critic, curator or editor.

I can’t measure the impact she has had on this corner of the art world, although it is nothing short of profound, but of course it would feel that way because her impact on me was profound.

Without a doubt this week’s episode will be dedicated to her, but it is more correct to say, that for me, Bad at Sports is dedicated to Kathryn. She was the one who planted the seeds for me. She was the one who taught me that there was a lot to be learned from interrogating the world around us. She was the one who taught me that sometime the answers were not in the studio, but in your community. She was also the one that talked me out of becoming an architect.

Years after I had finished my Masters degree, I bought her dinner, in the hopes that she would write me a letter of recommendation. I planning on going back to school to become an architect. She said “No,” and it shocked the heck out of me. She said she would write me as many letters, for as many teaching jobs as I would ever want to apply for, but that she would never write a letter to help me move out of being an artist.

Beyond the countless hours she spent in my studio when I was a high-maintenance grad student, and the hundreds more she spent with me as a friend in the years that followed, I remember the day she told me “No.” She was like that: tough enough to say “no” to a friend and do it with love. It was the same ethic she manifested in decades of pushing emerging Chicago art out into a world that has more reasons not to care, than care. She was strong enough to fight for what she believed in, even if what she believed in was you at a time when you had given up all hope.

Good bye Kathryn. We love you and thank you.

links…
Trib
Time Out Chicago
Adobe Airstream

UPDATE: Hamish Fulton walks with you and Bernard Williams gets re-instated

October 27, 2010 · Print This Article


Two things are happening that you need to be aware of and that should not be missed.

First thing first…

On Thursday, October 28, at 12 pm, Hamish Fulton will conduct an artist walk in Chicago. Open to any and all individuals interested in participating, this walk will illuminate the importance of a local community’s involvement in Fulton’s artistic practice as a walking artist. We ask interested participants to meet at Jackson & Michigan Avenue in the Loop by the bust of Sir George Solti (located exactly East of S. Michigan Avenue, south of E. Jackson Drive, near the Art Institute of Chicago). The walk will last approximately one hour and fifteen minutes. Those who arrive after noon are welcome to observe the walk in progress but will not be able to participate. We also recommend that participants bring a watch or a mobile phone which has a timer.

Update from Rhona Hoffman Gallery…

Hamish Fulton Artist Walk in Chicago

****PLEASE NOTE NEW MEETING LOCATION!!****

Today, October 28, at 12 pm, Hamish Fulton will conduct an artist walk in Chicago. Open to any and all individuals interested in participating, this walk will illuminate the importance of a local community’s involvement in Fulton’s artistic practice as a walking artist. We ask interested participants to meet at the NEW location: Jackson & Michigan Avenue in the Loop by the bust of Sir George Solti (located exactly East of S. Michigan Avenue, south of E. Jackson Drive, near the Art Institute of Chicago). The walk will last approximately one hour and fifteen minutes. Those who arrive after Noon are welcome to observe the walk in progress but will not be able to participate. We also recommend that participants bring a watch or a mobile phone which has a timer.

The rumor is that it is to be an unusual, amazing, and atypical walk. I for one will be there.

Second…

Bernard Williams could use your votes. By now you all know that Williams is back into the Art Loop Open (for more information check out Abraham’s post) but he has lost a few voting days and will surly be at a disadvantage. We at Bad at Sports are totally biased towards our own Steve Hamann but Williams also could use some voting love. If he is your guy get on it, if not, go STEVE!

Art Loop Open? WTF is with your voting policy?

October 24, 2010 · Print This Article

Admittedly, I have been only slightly interested in the Art Loop Open. That changed Friday when they became the center of local controversy (and when our friend Steve Hamann made the top ten.) A friend of the show sent us these two emails detailing the controversy…

————————————————————————————————

email 1. Friday.

1. Today, Art Loop Open announced the top ten finalists in the first year of their competition. A couple hours, later, Bernard Williams was disqualified because someone else (without his knowledge) distributed the number of his artwork around Columbia College.

2. There were 4 venues that contributed no artists to the top ten (Allegro, Palmer, Merch Mart, Hard Rock) though they represented 35% of the artists in the competition. By contrast, 5 other venues (Metra, Burnham, Macy’s, Wit, and W) represented only 19% of the artists, but contributed exactly half of the top 10 artists. Further, it’s interesting to note that 70% of the top ten were located within one block of Block 37, although only 50% of the total artworks were located in this area. All of the venues without winners are located farther than 1/5 mile from Block 37.

This begs the question: does the choice of where the artwork is placed affect the outcome of the voting? Taking note of the poor exhibition conditions of the Hard Rock Cafe, Palmer House, and other venues, the answer would seem to be affirmative. Block 37, as the center of the activities surrounding ALO, clearly was also the center of activity for public voting. Artists not positioned in or near this location, in my opinion, were put at a severe disadvantage.

email 2. Sunday morning

I did a little research and found that Bernard Williams’ number was not the only number “published” during the first round of Art Loop Open voting. This begs the question: why were the other artists not disqualified, especially the other 3 artists who are in the top ten and who’s numbers appear in the following video.

In this first video, at least 40 artist’s numbers were published online on Thursday October 21st, and they may need to be disqualified.

Three of the artists have been listed in the top ten:
1. #6 geo (aka giovanni arce), whose number and wall text appear very clearly around 1min 46sec into the video
2. #82 Catherine Jacobi appears within the first 4 seconds of the video
3. #22 Lauren Brescia appears within the first 4 seconds of the video

In the first four seconds of the video, the following artist’s numbers appear along with the photos of their artworks: 4, 25, 50, 61, 32, 53, 63, 73, 82, 109, 10, 33, 55, 65, 74, 80, 110, 22, 41, 56, 66, 76, 90, 112, 23, 46, 58, 68, 77, 95, 113, 23, 47, 60, 69, 78, 98, and 114

Artits 119’s number as well as artwork also appears at 1min 13 seconds into the video.

Artist 140 appears at 25 sec.

Artist 90 appears very clearly at 33sec.

The video can be found here: http://news.medill.northwestern.edu/chicago/news.aspx?id=170772

In this video, dated October 15th, another 5 artists numbers appear: 138, 66, 185, 119, 161.

—————————————————-

Why bother eliminating Bernard Williams when you know that every artist in the open emailed their friends to have them vote for them? With real money at stake you have to expect that every artist is going to do what they can to get in to the finals (not to mention their friends and frequent collaborators, GO STEVE!) Then they changed the final voting rules which seem to say, in essence… Hey have your friends vote but just have them vote once. Doesn’t that leave Bernard out in the cold for no reason? The Loop Open doesn’t even know that he is personally responsible for the perceived infraction. Sounds like someone over reacted and cost one artist their shot at the money and that seems kinda shitty. So ALO wtf is with your voting policies?

Here is a link to their voting policies

And Bernard’s work (which is pretty kick ass)

and the controversy