September 24, 2015 · Print This Article

We as Bad at Sports have mourned mentors, friends, and family here, but we have never had to mourn one of us.

Jeriah Hildwine was a complex member of Bad at Sports and his “take” on the issues we approach was often divisive, but we all respected and never questioned his commitment, enthusiasm, and the tenacity he showed. He never did anything in half measures whether you agreed with him or not.

We will all remember and honor his standard of engagement with art and the world, a standard that few could match.

Tonight we raise a glass to a comrade who lost his way.

Arizona Daily Sun

Ugh. So that happened.

June 24, 2015 · Print This Article


So this week we experienced a new kind of technical problem. While we are figuring out how to get over it, you should check out Iceberg Projects closing on Saturday from 6-9 pm. In a perfect world you would be listening to Dr. Dan Berger and Aldo Hernandez talk about Art+ Positive. You would already know why you had to check it out.

Hopeful we can sort ourselves out soon.


Hail Richard! Hail Jamilee! Here Here!

April 8, 2015 · Print This Article

Saying good bye is always hard. But sometimes, saying good bye is more like saying “See you later.”  This is the case for us this month at Bad At Sports. Both Richard Holland and Jamilee Polson Lacy have revised their participation with our project and entered semi-retirement.


Jamilee left Chicago six months ago and took along her brilliant artist husband Steve Lacy (of Academy Records.) She remained as our Blog Czar for a couple of months before quietly handing the reins over to Dana Bassett. Jamilee embraced her role with B@S with gusto. Reshaping what Caroline Picard had produced and building a more efficient machine on top of it. Her strength allowed B@S to start seeing a stronger future for the project.

Jamilee left Chicago to be appointed Director and Curator of PC Galleries at Providence College in Providence, Rhode Island, and she leaves all of us with a great hole to fill in our independent curatorial ranks. Few and far between are curators with the creativity, curiosity, depth, breadth, business sense, and raw ambition of our Jamilee.

Jamilee’s last Chicago exhibition at Columbia College’s A+D gallery, “Types by Display,” was easily the best graphic design-oriented exhibition presented in Chicago last year and I was grateful to spend a significant amount of time with it.



Richard Holland’s retirement is a harder thing to get my head around.  What can one say about the leaving of a partner and founder? We have worked arm-in-arm together for 500 weeks and I love him like a brother. It is difficult for me to imagine the project without him. Our show will miss its ever-present host and his wit and erudition.

Richard leaves to focus on his growing Real Estate and Legal practices, and to spend a little more time with his family. There are also rumors he is amassing an army of hybrid space crafts for an intergalactic war.


“Thank you,” hardly seems to cover the debt we owe Richard and Jamilee. They have made a defining impact on the project’s past and it’s future and both leave shoes that can never be filled. But we will not be completely without Richard as he will continue to be a dominant voice on our twitter feed and occasionally will reprise his role as interviewer, producer, and editor. Likewise, Jamilee swore to me that she would return to writing and sharing the East Coast’s art world just as soon as she settles into a solid groove.


think WMFU on acid.

February 25, 2015 · Print This Article

Our friends at the PMI want you all to do this by March 1st… BECAUSE IT WILL CHANGE ALL OF OUR LIVES. Also we are super excited about this.


Festival is: April 23-May 3, 2015
Submissions are due: March 1, 2015


For the past 14 years Version Festival has introduced innovative projects that tackle local social and urban issues. The festival highlights projects and people that engage public interest and promote the cultural use of public space.

Attention radio producers, audio alchemists, activists, DJs, podcasters, record labels, ham operators, bands, storytellers, spoken word artists, time travelers, poets, librarians, art critics, educators, performance artists, and sound editors! Imagine you have a radio station. What will you do with it?

Think about it! Because just recently the FCC granted the Public Media Institute, our nonprofit corporation, a license to build a low-power FM station to serve our community and up to 2.3 million Chicago listeners. We are in the process of raising funds to build the station – it’s our most ambitious media project to date.

So, this year VERSION is an on-air laboratory and campaign to create the kind of radio station we believe our city needs. Our station will be a conduit for musicians, artists, thinkers, critics, activists, and instigators from Chicago and around the world, and so our festival will serve as a beta test for producing and experiencing these essential sounds, ideas, and programs. We need your help to decide what these are. This CALL FOR SOUNDS!!! is an invitation for YOU to create a show, a sound, or an experience, for live broadcast on the airwaves and the internet.

In addition we will transform our gallery, the Co-Prosperity Sphere, into a studio for recording and broadcasting live events and programming. We will also record and broadcast live music, performance, and weird shows from clubs and spaces throughout the city. Everything presented at VERSION will be aired online, and then rebroadcast when our station is built and the transmitter and tower are installed.

We seek programs in these categories:
MUSIC: live or prerecorded DJ sets or musical performance, of all kinds
RADIO ART: programs made by musicians, artists, and critics, of all kinds
NEWS AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS: locally-produced news and public affairs programming (including documentaries)
TALK: talks, discussions, or educational broadcasting for special audiences, the general public, or your neighbors

GUIDELINES: If you want to be one of our regular DJs, consider VERSION your audition. We are accepting applications for regular shows on a monthly or weekly basis, short series, or one-offs in 30, 60, or 90-minute increments. (Shorter pieces may also be considered.) If you have a special idea requiring physical space, consider using our gallery or else please indicate the facility, time, and date you desire.

Please include the following in your proposal (incomplete applications will not be considered as earnestly):
Title of your program:
Length of your program:
Your name:
Your email:
Your telephone:
An associated URL:
A link to your program materials (this can be as simple as a Spotify playlist, an iTunes podcast, or an MP3):
A paragraph description of your program (100-250 words, in MSWord):


Produced by the Public Media Institute, a non profit 501(c)(3) arts organization, Version is an annual springtime arts festival that brings together hundreds of artists, musicians, and educators from around the world to present some of the most challenging ideas and progressive art initiatives of our day. The festival showcases emerging trends in art, technology and music.

For the past 14 years Version Festival has introduced innovative projects that tackle local social and urban issues. The festival highlights projects and people that engage public interest and promote the cultural use of public space.

THANK YOU for your time!!
See you at VERSION 2015!

Michael Miller.

September 29, 2014 · Print This Article



Michael Miller was an incredible educator, a great printmaker, a good friend, and my world feels a little smaller without him.

I met Michael in 2000 when I came to tour the School of The Art Institute of Chicago as a prospective graduate student. I went on to assist (TA) his classes for a couple of years and I learned much from his easy demeanor and casual laugh. He brought an unusual sense of calm to those of us lucky enough to be in his presence. As a TA, Michaels classes were heavenly. He gave me a bunch of materials and told me to work constantly and bring as much energy to the class as I could muster. If he thought I was doing something interesting, he would have me demo it for the students. It felt like the gift I needed to keep me connected to printmaking. I spent most of graduate school exploring video, photography, sound, and electronics, and I often felt like I was floating away from the discipline that had brought me to art in the first place. Michael seemed to instinctively recognize this and made sure I had a home there.

He had a remarkable commitment to his students and the students of the department of Print Media, where he taught for 40 years. He was the kind of professor you could reach out to several years after leaving school and he would happily buy you a beer and help you with your problems. His advice was always spot on and I was lucky to be have often been its beneficiary.

The thing I will miss the most about Michael is the warmth  he showed. He could always be relied upon to be a sympathetic face in an unfriendly crowd and his presence made a room easier for those of us who had to inhabited it.

I’m going to miss him.

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