Much Much More Lecture Series presents: Claudine Isé

July 31, 2013 · Print This Article

Claudine Isé will be giving a talk this  Saturday at the Humboldt Park library as part of Philip von Zweck’s Much Much More lecture series. I’ve been to one of these thus far and  loved it — something about going to a library on a Saturday afternoon to hear an artist/writer talk about his or her work outside the context of an exhibition, or even an art institution. Isé has contributed to Bad at Sports extensively in the past, often behind the scenes. Like many, I have benefitted tremendously from her insight about this blog in the past, and continue to admire her critical writing. To that end, I’m especially looking forward to hearing her present her own work, off the page and in person. This event was also included on Bassett’s What’s the T this week.

Image: Tom Marioni, “Café Society," San Francisco, 1979

Image: Tom Marioni, “Café Society,” San Francisco, 1979

@ Humboldt Park branch, Chicago Public Library

1605 N. Troy Street

August 3, from 3PM – 4PM

Notes on the Art of Conversation
Claudine Isé will share notes from her in-progress research on the history of conversation as an artistic medium and an art form—from Tom Marioni’s 1970 “The Act of Drinking Beer With Friends is the Highest Form of Art,” and William Furlong’sAudio Arts series of taped conversations with artists conducted from 1973-1984, to Hans Ulrich Obrist’s The Interview Project, Jeremy Deller’s It is What it Is: Conversations about Iraq held at the MCA Chicago and other institutions, Jason Lazarus’ installation The Search,Ted Efremoff and Rebecca Parker’s 24 Hour Conversation project, the ongoing series of podcast conversations conducted by the collective Bad at Sports, and more.  
Claudine Isé is a freelance arts writer, educator, and former editor of the Art21 Blog who is a regular contributor to the Chicago Tribune, the Chicago Reader, and Artforum.com. She has also written for Art Papers, Chicago magazine, Art Ltd., Bad at Sports (www.badatsports.com) and the Art21 Blog. Isé is an adjunct assistant professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago, where she teaches graduate courses in the Art History and Art Departments on writing for exhibitions as well as on the history of artists’ writings. Prior to moving to Chicago in 2008, she was the associate curator of exhibitions at the Wexner Center in Columbus, OH and before that, the Assistant Curator of Contemporary Art at the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles, where she curated numerous Hammer Projects exhibitions. Isé has Ph.D. in Film, Literature and Culture from the University of Southern California.
 
Image: Tom Marioni, “Café Society,” San Francisco, 1979

Week In Review: A range of motion

July 28, 2013 · Print This Article

Amanda Ross-Ho

Check out this week’s most awesome podcast interview with Amanda Ross-Ho!

Amanda Ross-Ho’s work is inspired by detritus: the clutter and remnants of daily existence, and the ‘negative space’ of things over looked. Ranging from sculpture, installation, painting, and photography, her work seeks to uncover the subtle beauty of coincidence and anomaly. 

Otherwise the week began with a re-post. I found an essay written by Prolapsarian on the internet that seemed interesting. (Maybe especially because I am so often duped by works/albums/movies that try to affect a negative critique of capitalism while in fact propagating similarly dubious hierarchies). It begins as a letter to  Goldsmith Students about their MFA show:

I want to write to you about a single gesture that was performed by a great majority of the artworks in the show (although there were some important exceptions). It is a gesture that claims to determine a relation between artworks and “capitalism”. It is of no surprise that under the contemporary situation of global capital, undergoing its most profound crisis in eighty years – creating conditions not only of mass destitution but also of mass resistance and protest – that the relation between art and capital would present itself more explicitly in the new works of art than has been the case in the last decades. But the expression of this relation of art and capital in the work displayed at your show was not only predictable, but questionable on both political and aesthetic grounds. The gesture that I refer to is that of artworks that attempt to parody capitalism, and in this parody hope to effect a critical irony through the apparent distance between the artwork (and its social situation) and the forms of commodity or capital that it parodies. In this gesture the artwork proclaims a radicalism, a dissatisfaction with the actually existing. It proclaims that the object of this dissatisfaction is “capitalism”. 

Anna Friz "Nocturne." Photo by Amanda Gutierrez.

Anna Friz “Nocturne.” Photo by Amanda Gutierrez.

Atlanta Resident, Meredith Kooi, wrote about Chicago this month, covering a recent performance and installation at Tri-Triangle:

Anna Friz and Coppice performed in their audio installation at Tritriangle on 5/25/2013 in Chicago, IL. The two installations and two live performances occupied the gallery as co-existing organisms. [1] Each stemming from Friz’s and Coppice’s own larger overarching projects, Friz’s Nocturne and Coppice’s A Vinculum Variation are iterations, though it becomes clear that these iterations are not repetitions, but manifestations of differences in space, time, and materiality. The artists filled the spaces above my head and below/around my feet with sounds produced by other bodies: people, instruments, apparatuses, and radios. The two installations created the terrain in which the live performances inhabited. The earthy landscape, coupled with a cloud of respiration, constituted a world of transmission that enabled relationships to form in and between bodies.

Serenade at Terrain Exhibitions. Curated by Tempestt Hazel, with work by Jeff Austin, Rob Frye,Ramah Jihan Malebranche, Michael and Yhelena Hall, Viktor Le and Stephen Lieto.

Serenade at Terrain Exhibitions. Curated by Tempestt Hazel, with work by Jeff Austin, Rob Frye,Ramah Jihan Malebranche, Michael and Yhelena Hall, Viktor Le and Stephen Lieto.

Top 5 courtesy of Stephanie Burke!

HEAVENLY BREAKFAST: AN ESSAY ON THE WINTER OF LOVE by Samuel R. Delany (Bantam, 1979)

HEAVENLY BREAKFAST: AN ESSAY ON THE WINTER OF LOVE by Samuel R. Delany (Bantam, 1979)

Mairead Case is currently embedded in Naropa, where she wrote her latest edition of MAINTENANCE, discussing such works as + Heavenly Breakfast: an Essay on the Winter of Love by Samuel R. Delany (Bantam, 1979), Under Milk Wood: A Play for Voices by Dylan Thomas (New Directions, 1954), Civil Disobediences, edited by Lisa Birman and Anne Waldman (Coffee House Press, 2004), “A poem for record players” by John Wieners (1958) and more:

I’m still in Boulder. I decided to write you from here, even though I need to turn in my portfolio soon eek, because I like the idea of book-review-as-postcard. I am writing you now, before I get back and set this experience against Chicago’s meat and concrete and home. I didn’t want to write starry-eyed, and I didn’t want to write retrospectively. I just want to show you some books I read while I was here, because I found them, living in a city where the sky—not the neighborhood—is what centers.

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I posted Saturday’s column “Endless Opportunities” that highlighted (among other things) some publication options in honor of the Printers Ball.

Screen shot 2013-07-28 at 3.02.50 PM

DineLA is happening now, and Adrienne Harris gives a report of her own experience at the Lexington Social Club:

Even though I am very involved in the restaurant world (I work part time in a fancy steak house and I love eating out) somehow DineLA always sneaks up on me. Like the Holiday Season or my birthday, DineLA is always suddenly upon me and I have done nothing to prepare. DineLA is like Brigadoon to me. I…We chose a hip Hollywood venue called The Lexington Social House which turns into a night club after 10:00 pm but serves delicious chilled english pea soup with crab and bacon and bone marrow encrusted filet mignon before the dancing begins.

 

Endless Opportunities : In and Out of Print

July 27, 2013 · Print This Article

pb-poster-final-low-res_4

1. Artist Residency Program is open for applications at the Experimental Sound Studio:

ESS is extremely pleased to announce the next installment of the Artist Residency Program, thanks once again to a generous grant from the National Endowment for the Arts. We will offer four 40-hour residencies through the 2013-14 Artists Residency Program (ARP). Candidates must be US residents; at least three of the residencies are for Chicago area artists, and one residency will be open to a non-Chicago US artist. Each residency includes access to the ESS recording facilities with engineering assistance. http://www.experimentalsoundstudio.org/pages/artist_residency_program/24.php

2. Apply to the Propeller Fund! Gallery 400 at the University of Illinois at Chicago and threewalls announce a call for applications to the Propeller Fund, entering its fourth year as a granting opportunity for independent visual artists, curators, and visual arts groups in Cook County, IL. Applications are due August 1, 2013, with 15 grantees announced in October 2013. A total $50,000 will be disbursed in 2013. More about that on their website here.

3. And this from Edra Soto on facebook: OPEN CALL – WIND CHIME 

As part of the events taking place during the Chicago Artists Month, Garfield Park Conservatory will be hosting the exhibition WIND CHIME. Garfield Park Conservatory has made available 30 trees to display wind chimes for this exhibition. THE PURPOSE OF THIS CALL IS TO:• Complement the art & music programs taking place during the Chicago Artists Month at Garfield Park Conservatory.• An opportunity to promote your organization events during the East Garfield Park weekend of art sponsored by Chicago Artists Month and New City.• Strengthen the relationship of the East Garfield Park arts communities.ELIGIBILITY:This call is open to artists with residence in East Garfield Park and artists affiliated to the following neighborhood organizations: Switching Stations, Albany Carroll Studios, West Carroll Avenue Studios, West Side Cultural Arts Council, The Golden Dome, Adds Donnas, Devening Projects, The Hills Esthetic Center, The Franklin, Julius Caesar, Peregrine Program, East Garfield Park GUILDHOW TO APPLY:• Submit a comprehensive sketch on jpg format no bigger than 1240 x 1240 dpi that illustrates your idea accompanied by a word document with that includes: your name, phone number and email; a brief description of the concept and materials you will be using to create your project; your affiliation to East Garfield Park community.• Send applications to edrasoto@hotmail.com• Open call starts Wednesday, July 17, 2013 and ends Saturday, August 23, 2013 CRITERIA:• Original, artistic quality. • Safe materials.• Strength of build sculpture /weather resistance. Your work will be exposed to unpredictable types of weather. GPC is not responsible for damaged work.• Works needs to be delivered ready to install. • All sculptures will be displayed suspended high off the ground.

I’m admittedly inspired by today’s Printers Ball (hence the poster above), and as a result the following calls are a bit unusual for a visual art blog. However, I think the following publications could offer interesting avenues for the publication and dissemination of your visual work/research practices/writing. I’m always interested in finding bridges between disciplines. So with that disclaimer in mind:

4.  Journal of Artistic Research:

We invite submissions to JAR from all fields and disciplines in which artistic research may be relevant, including areas that may not usually be conceived of as ‘artistic’. Although the journal has emerged as a result of demand in the academic field, JAR welcomes submissions from practitioners with or without academic affiliations. 

The key problem for many involved in artistic research is ‘writing’ and its authority. In response to this, JAR introduces a new format for publishing artistic research, the ‘exposition’, a multi-media document that can combine and interlink text, image, film and audio material on one or more scrollable pages. Go here to read more about their submission process and see examples of the work they have published in the past.

5. Cabinet Magazine: Deadlines for forthcoming issues for which we are accepting submissions:

Issue 52 (Winter 2013–2014, with a themed section on “Celebration”): 15 September 2013
Issue 53 (Spring 2014, with a themed section on “Stones”): 15 November 2013
Issue 54 (Summer 2014, with a themed section on “The Accident”): 15 February 2014
Issue 55 (Fall 2014, with a themed section on “Love”): 15 May 2014
Issue 56 (Winter 2014–2015, with a themed section on “Sports”): 15 August 2014
Issue 57 (Spring 2015, with a themed section on “Catastrophe”): 15 November 2014 

Details on their guidelines and submission process here.

6. Hobart 15 (a print anthology) — HOTEL CULTURE

We’re reopen for print! And… you know the deal. We rock a theme issue every other issue, which means we’re due for a theme. Our theme: HOTEL CULTURE.

What that means: open to your interpretation.

Reminder: we love both fiction and nonfiction. Oh! Also: art.

Finally: we’re reading everything blind. Don’t put your name on your submission. If your name’s anywhere on the doc, it (and you) will be disqualified. (I guess, also, no need to be clever or impressive in your bio, as we won’t be able to see them anyway.) More info here.

Repost: A Letter to Goldsmiths art students on capitalism, art and pseudo-critique

July 23, 2013 · Print This Article

The following article has been circulating around the art-internet of late and I thought I’d repost it here for your consideration.

photo-main

A Letter to Goldsmiths art students on capitalism, art and pseudo-critique

written by Prolapsarian

Dear Goldsmiths Art Students, I attended your MFA show two nights ago. I apologise to an extent: with so many artworks on display it was difficult to digest any of them. That situation was exacerbated by the fact that so few of the works seemed to have it in them to behave destructively towards the others. Maybe this is where I can begin: that the type of co-operation between artworks, their intellectual co-ordination, is something I find troubling. It didn’t seem to me to be the co-operation of a school thinking together, but instead the co-ordination of the school uniform, of a discipline that had been so fully internalised that all of the artworks, under its authority, might comfortably coalesce. That made those artworks difficult to be with. I want to write to you about a single gesture that was performed by a great majority of the artworks in the show (although there were some important exceptions). It is a gesture that claims to determine a relation between artworks and “capitalism”. It is of no surprise that under the contemporary situation of global capital, undergoing its most profound crisis in eighty years – creating conditions not only of mass destitution but also of mass resistance and protest – that the relation between art and capital would present itself more explicitly in the new works of art than has been the case in the last decades. But the expression of this relation of art and capital in the work displayed at your show was not only predictable, but questionable on both political and aesthetic grounds. The gesture that I refer to is that of artworks that attempt to parody capitalism, and in this parody hope to effect a critical irony through the apparent distance between the artwork (and its social situation) and the forms of commodity or capital that it parodies. In this gesture the artwork proclaims a radicalism, a dissatisfaction with the actually existing. It proclaims that the object of this dissatisfaction is “capitalism”. The modes of making explicit the structure of parody are plural: some take up the bathetic disjunction through a fully instrumental comparison with some hazy far-away classicism or humanism; others exaggerate the shoddiness of capital’s products; others rely on a revelatory mode whereby it is claimed something of capital’s seamy underbelly is exposed; while others are just bits of fixed capital – most often employing the high technologies of marketing – transposed into the gallery-space. But the gesture of this parody common to all of them will, I imagine, be familiar to you. read more

Week in Review: Jay-Z and Effort Trend

July 21, 2013 · Print This Article

e-for-effort
On the podcast this week we talk with Roseann Weiss the Director of the Community & Public Arts Department at the St. Louis Regional Arts Commission. 

Clowes, Eightball

Sara Drake posted a thoughtful essay about Daniel Clowes’ MCA restrospective. Her review opens with a well-considered point about the time line the MCA presents at the beginning of Clowes’ show (“the timeline epitomizes a friction still present between comics and art institutions’ reluctant willingness to accept them as one of their own,”) going on to focus on the show itself:

Comics exhibitions are typically, perhaps even inherently, about process. The work on the walls is unstable and has not yet calcified into it’s final form as a work of art. Clowes’s comics are intentionally built to be read. The focus is on narrative structure and storytelling, as opposed to the flip-side of playing with the visual richness of the medium. Reading desks and large, upholstered nooks with copies of Clowes’s books dapple the space while original pages of his comics span the width of the galleries. The result is claustrophobic in a good way, providing a daunting depiction of the amount of labor involved in comics creation. Clowes’s work is more emblematic of illustration than that of a painter or print maker, albeit his skills as a draftsmen almost render the various changes that occur during printing production invisible: penciling or under drawings are rarely present, Clowes’s adept brush work meticulously cover the initial draft,  and the gouache painted covers in the show are breathtaking. The flawlessness of the line work and the confidence embedded in Clowes’s drawings almost seem to undermine the self-doubt and alienation present within his stories.

jz1

The week began with our ever fabulous gossip report courtesy of Dana Bassett. Everybody loves Keith Haring, Andrew Santa Lucia covers Logan Hardware, and Anthony Romero published a column about Jay-Z’s performance:

Just when we thought the world was safe from appropriating celebrities (#LoveYouMiley) Jay-Z swags in and tries his hand at the most bodily of professions, Performance Art. This, as you may well know, is NOT his first attempt at a durational performance. HOVA and Yeezus reportedly played Ni**s in Paris a record breaking number of times.* We all did for that matter and in case you were wondering, there are five more works of art from Jay to come. So we can all relax, there’s plenty of newsfeed fodder forthcoming. Word on the street is that there may be images of a Jesus chain in a jar of urine surfacing soon.

Best of Lists in the summer time… WHAT? That’s right. Here is Paul Germanos’ annual top 16 in photos.

Gartelmann, Arctander

Chicago Artist Writers contributed another piece from their most excellent blog. James Pepper Kelly writes about the controversial exhibit, Wierd Dude Energy at Heaven Gallery calling forth other spectral voices to do so:

Walter Benjamin |   At the center of this exhibition is man. Present-day man; a reduced man, therefore, chilled in a chilly environment. Since, however, this is the only one we have, it is in our interest to know him. He is subjected to tests, examinations. What emerges is this: Weird Dude Energy (WDE), a layering of men, a group perspective on masculinity.

Double Rapper with cheese

Double Rapper with cheese

Thomas Friel also wrote about Jay-Z’s performance at Pace Chelsea last week, reflecting on the performance and place and celebrity via instant, public documentation:

A celebrity’s presence in our space, instead of the media version we tend to see them as confirms our own existence. At the same time, it complicates that existence. We are seen by those we have saw but here unto unseen by. I see (consume one’s image) therefore I am, but when I am seen, what am I? It is mindfuck of Turrell like proportions, as we lose our sense of up and down, left and right. We choke on our own vomit, we are paralyzed. In exchange, or maybe as a symbiotic response, we return them to a mediated image from our cellphone capture. Shrinking them to a 2.5” x 3.5” format, moving at a mere 16fps, they are more manageable as a digital apparition.  With Jay-Z rapping in our face – a desire of many to be that close to a living legend, to be acknowledged by He who hath created the current state of Hip Hop – we are quickly overwhelmed, and thus respond with our cell phone’s sad idea of video to return to a sense of normality. It helps us relate to his intangible nature. It is in this way that we treat the celebrity both as a solar eclipse and a stripper at a gentlemen’s club. At at least one point during “Picasso Baby”, a tight circle forms around Jay-Z. We see his professional camera crew which is typically meant to be invisible. They are anything but in the many cell shots taken, reminding us that this is a planned operation, to be dissected and re-edited later.  However, their visibility being an anomaly, suggests a future that is somewhat less imminent than the rapidity of the cell phone.

Thru-Lines at 65Grand

Thru-Lines at 65Grand

The week closed out with a Top 2 Weekend pics, courtesy of Stephanie Burk

and a list of opportunities….