Hirst reported as major investor in the purchase of his own diamond skull

September 5, 2007 · Print This Article

MoneyAs reported on Artnet and referred by Tony Fitzpatrick

HIRST BUYS HIS OWN SKULL. . .
“He only recognizes art with his wallet,” Damien Hirst once said of collector Charles Saatchi, “he believes he can affect art values with buying power, and he still believes he can do it.” The quote reverberated ironically as it was announced that Hirst himself was part of the investment group that is purchasing For the Love of God, his $100-million platinum-and-diamond skull, recently on view at the White Cube gallery in London.

Hirst’s involvement in the purchase (as well as the sale) raised immediate questions about the deal, with Bloomberg reporter Linda Sandler suggesting that perhaps “Hirst hasn’t yet found a final buyer for his most expensive artwork, at a time when hedge fund managers and other art collectors have lost money in the credit markets.” Several years ago, when Saatchi sold off his collection of Hirst works, the artist teamed up with his gallery, with much fanfare, to repurchase his own works — a move that no doubt boosted his market value, not unlike when corporations buy back their own stock to raise their share price. [Read more]

Episode 105: Mucho Stuffo

September 2, 2007 · Print This Article

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This week Clare Britt from Fraction Workspace stops by to give the run down on a couple of the European shows with Duncan and Joanna. Namely Documenta and Munster. She will be back next week To consider Venice.

Also the fine and wacky folks from The Alliance of Pentaphilic Curators show up to encourage Philip von Zweck’s friends to explain why it should have been them while they “roast the bastard” in recognition of the sizable grant he won this year.

The opening and closing songs of this week’s show are there largely to amuse Kaveh Soofi.
If you don’t get it, you don’t, sorry.

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Hirst diamond skull finally sells after 2+ months for $100 million.

August 30, 2007 · Print This Article

Hirst Skull
An unnamed investment group has agreed to pay $100 million in cash for the final piece of Daimen Hirst’s June 3rd show at London’s White Cube Gallery. The platinum skull, studded with 8,601 diamonds was the final piece and brings the 2 gallery exhibition to a total of 180 million pounds ($362.4 million),

“The sale is expected to close in three to four weeks, when all the paperwork is finished, Frank Dunphy, Hirst’s business manager said. The group of buyers would be required to show the skull for two or three years in museums around the world.”

Usually, buyers operating at the $100 million level would get a discount, private dealer Richard Polsky said.

The buyers probably wouldn’t be “diamond people,” because the skull’s price was so much higher than the value of the diamond content, said London jeweler and art collector Laurence Graff, who looked at the skull when it was on show and didn’t buy it.

“I’m in the diamond business and I would only be interested in diamonds at diamond prices,” Graff said in a telephone interview today.”

The skull’s sale would enrich Hirst, 42, whose fortune has been valued at 130 million pounds by the London-based Sunday Times and who may get 75 percent or more of the proceeds of a sale, according to art professionals.
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Episode 104: Brian Holmes with Lane Relyea

August 26, 2007 · Print This Article

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Brian Holmes
The show opens with a bang! Britton Bertran’s car is hit and we are the witnesses.

And as you listen to this week’s intro designed specifically to irritate Duncan, pause a moment and say to yourself…”Seriously? Episode 104?” Richard’s parents have called us both to mention how happy they are. Here we are poised on the cusp of another Bad at Sports season and this week Duncan is joined by friends of the show Lane Relyea and Claire Pentecost to interview/interrogate French American Theorist and Art Critic Brian Holmes.

As we roll over the two year mark we once again are faced with questions about the Bad at Sports Project. We know what we think but once again we want to hear from you. Please email your thoughts about the show and your hopes for it’s future to badatsports@gmail.com please use the header “Hope Chest.” Thanks in advance for taking the time to help us get better.

Piet Zwart Institute Bio for Brian Holmes-
Brian Holmes is an art and cultural critic, activist and translator, living in Paris, interested primarily in the intersections of artistic and political practice. He holds a doctorate in Romance Languages and Literatures from the University of California at Berkeley. He was the English editor of publications for Documenta X, Kassel, Germany, 1997, was a member of the graphic arts group Ne pas plier from 1999 to 2001, and has recently worked with the French conceptual art group Bureau d’études. He is a frequent contributor to the international mailinglist Nettime, a member of the editorial committee of the art magazine “Springerin” and the political-economy journal “Multitudes”, a regular contributor to the magazine Parachute, and a founder of the new journal “Autonomie Artistique”. He is currently preparing a book in French, entitled “La personnalité flexible: Pour une nouvelle critique de la culture.”

http://brianholmes.wordpress.com/

Theo Hakola is a god among men.
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Episode 103: Carol Becker

August 19, 2007 · Print This Article

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Duncan and Terri talk to Carol Becker about the School of the Art Institute, the future of arts education, and her new position at Columbia University.

ALSO: THE INCREDIBLE RETURN OF MIKE AND THE 30 SECONDS MOVIE REVIEWS with bonus seconds.

Dean of Faculty and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

She is the author of numerous articles and several books with many foreign editors. Her book publications include: The Invisible Drama: Women and The Anxiety of Change; The Subversive Imagination: Artists, Society, and Social Responsibility; Zones of Contention: Essays on Art, Institutions, Gender, and Anxiety; and most recently, Surpassing the Spectacle: Global Transformations and the Changing Politics of Art.

Prelude to published interview taken from the book, Conversations Before the End of Time by Suzi Gablik.
“In 1994, Carol Becker was appointed dean and vice-president for academic affairs of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, having been a former chair of the graduate division before that. She received her Ph.D. in literature at the University of San Diego, where she was a protégé of Herbert Marcuse. A lecturer in women’s studies since the late 1960s, and a writer on psychoanalytic theory and cultural politics, she has been mulling over the obsolete attitudes and strategies of the art world for a long time, particularly the issue of the artist’s responsibility to society, which she claims is a sensitive issue that makes everyone uncomfortable, defensive and insecure. Becker feels that many artists simply refuse to address the issue at all. Artists often choose rebellion, which alienates them from their audience, and then become angry at the degree to which they are unappreciated. In part this is a consequence of the way we educate students in art schools, envisioning the artist as a marginalized and romantic figure who, she claims, operates “out of what Freud calls the Pleasure Principle while the rest of us struggle within the Reality Principle.” Students need to think about their work, she feels, not in isolation, but in relationship to the public and to an audience that has not been addressed in art school pedagogical situations. American art students, like most American college students, Becker claims, have not been trained to think globally or politically about their position in society. In a sense, art has seceded from American culture so completely that it has lost its effectiveness and become a subsidized bureaucracy of self-serving specialists.”
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