Episode 131: Shaun O’Dell

March 2, 2008 · Print This Article

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Shaun O'Dell

This week, Amanda and Tom Sanford talk to Shaun O’Dell and Emily Prince about Shaun’s show “We Remember the Sun” at the Susan Inglett Gallery.

Shaun O’Dell makes drawings, videos, music and sometimes sculpture. His work explores the intertwining realities of the human and natural orders. O’Dell has exhibited his work at many venues, including the Jack Hanley Gallery in San Francisco and Los Angeles, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, UCLA Hammer Museum, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, Whitebox in New York, and the Marianne Boesky Gallery in New York.

His work is held in the permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art, New York, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, M.H. deYoung Memorial Museum and the Berkeley Art Museum. O’Dell received his MFA from Stanford University. He is the recipient of the 2006 Diebenkorn Teaching Fellowship from the San Francisco Art Institute, 2005 Artadia Award, 2004 SECA Award from the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and a 2002 Fleishhacker Foundation Award. He is currently teaching at University of California, Berkeley and California College of the Arts, and is the co-organizer of The New New Masses, a lecture series on Art and Politics.

SHAUN O’DELL
We Remember the Sun
Susan Inglett Gallery
522 W. 24 St.
New York, NY 10011

February 15th – March 15th
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Episode 130: Stephanie Smith-Adaptation

February 24, 2008 · Print This Article

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Stephanie Smith

This week Duncan and the always delightful Jeff Ward talk to Stephanie Smith, the Director of Collections and Exhibitions and Curator of Contemporary Art at the Smart Museum in Chicago about the current exhibition Adaptation: Video Installations by Ben-Ner, Herrera, Sullivan, and Sussman & The Rufus Corporation.

Holy guacamole am I sick this week, yuck. One of the joys of having a child in daycare.

Bad at Sports is officially panhandling for a used PC laptop as a donation, or a reasonably priced sale, to us. The IBM T-42 that has handled the last 130+ shows is fatally ill and needs replacement pronto. Please e-mail us at badatsports@gmail.com if you have something fairly recent laying about you would like to get off of your hands! Thanks.

Direct download: Bad_at_Sports_Episode_130-Stephaine_Smith.mp3

And we thought Fox News had cornered the market on extreme opinions.

February 21, 2008 · Print This Article

A debate between an Iraqi “Researcher on Astronomy” and a physicist on Iraqi television. This is not the only case of a debate of this nature, and you thought America could fill the 24/7 news cycle with some really odd debates.

Japan High Court Thinks Long & Hard About Mapplethorpe Book

February 19, 2008 · Print This Article

Mapplethorpe vs Japan
Japan’s Supreme Court has issued a landmark decision opening the way for the sale of a book of collected erotic photographs by the late Robert Mapplethorpe.

This would over rule a 2003 decision by the Tokyo High Court that banned the book’s sale because it was deemed indecent. Tuesday’s ruling is believed to be the first time the top court has overturned a lower court decision on obscenity.

Publisher Takashi Asai called it “groundbreaking” and predicted the ruling might “change [Japan’s] obscenity standard.”

Justice Kohei Nasu said the black-and-white portraits were from an “artistic point of view” and led the majority opinion of the five-judge panel that Mapplethorpe was “a leading figure in contemporary art.”

The justices did, however, throw out Asai’s demand for government compensation of arround $20,000 US.

Japan’s domestic obscenity laws were relaxed in the 1990s but imported publications are handled by customs and the laws still ban images of genitals.

Asai, of Uplink publishers, had argued that the import ban was obsolete, pointing out the Mapplethorpe book was in the Japanese parliament’s library and that copies were offered for sale on the internet.

His company had been selling the Japanese version of Mapplethorpe’s 384-page book since 1994. The book, entitled “Robert Mapplethorpe”, contains 20 close-up photos of male genitalia.

Everything changed in 1999 when airport customs officials in Japan confiscated a copy of the book that Asai had been carrying.

Then Tokyo police visited him and gave him a warning, causing Asai to voluntarily suspend sales of the book in 2000.

Asai decided to go to court and in 2002, he won a case in Tokyo District Court. The government was ordered to give back his book and to pay $6,480 US in damages. But a year later, a higher court overturned that ruling. At that point, Asai took the case to the highest court in the land. Leading to today’s ruling.

Episode 129: Hou Hanru

February 16, 2008 · Print This Article

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Hou Hanru
This week Brian, Marc, and Patrica sit down with Hou Hanru for a conversation over wine and olives.

Currently the Director of Exhibitions and Public Programs at SFAI, Hanru has curated a number of major international exhibitions including the Istanbul Biennale, Guangzhou Triennale, and 50th Venice Biennale.

The interview spans from Hanru’s education in china after the cultural revolution, globalism, principles of self organization, and what its like to curate both internationally and locally.
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