Episode 652: David Hockney

Episode 652: David Hockney


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This week we have the honor of welcoming David Hockney. One of the world’s most celebrated artists David joins us at an amazing time. We catch up with him in the context of his beautiful new show at Richard Gray gallery but we catch him the day before he is expected to become the artists whose work has broken the world record for highest price paid at auction for a work by a living artist. He is pretty chill about it and gives us a little bit of a lesson on perspective and how photography has rotted the Western mind. We also learn what VR might be good for.

Bad at Sports Sunday Comics with Tara Booth

Bad at Sports Sunday Comics with Tara Booth

By Krystal DiFronzo Tara Booth’s work is an assertive clash of color that depicts the most humbling and sticky situations. Some relatable moments include trying to pee while wearing a romper, cutting bangs into near oblivion, and stoned Amazon shopping (with the...
THINKS to Think

THINKS to Think

THINKS to Think is a new Wednesday feature for the reimagined Bad at Sports. Who better to inspire imagination than Dr. Seuss? Oh, the THINKS you can Think! is classic Seuss. I discovered it last Christmas when my brother gave a copy to his friend’s son–and...
In The Late Afternoon of Modernism: An Interview with Graham Harman

In The Late Afternoon of Modernism: An Interview with Graham Harman

In any case, four or five centuries from now when the end of modernism seems as obvious a historical fact as the birth of it, I think Latour will be seen as the one who really put his finger on what is central to modernism: an artificial taxonomy of natural and cultural (or world and thought) in which the two realms are supposed to be purified from one another. The reason so many philosophers have a hard time appreciating this is that philosophers are still pursuing a modernist project even as other disciplines have been compelled to move beyond it. The Owl of Minerva flies at dusk, so it must not be dusk quite yet. We are still in the late afternoon of modernism.