Chicago ARTADIA wants to help you!

July 31, 2012 · Print This Article

Chicago? Do you remember the folks at Artadia? They are the people that made the kick ass book we spent last summer with. (pictures included here.) They are also the organization that supports the heck out of some really great local and national artists and work to foster support for and awareness of artists outside of NYC and LA.

Their application cycle has once again come back to Chicago! You should apply. We are going to. The info is below.

APPLICATIONS FOR THE
ARTADIA AWARDS 2012 CHICAGO
CLOSE AUGUST 20. APPLY NOW!


Artadia: The Fund for Art and Dialogue is accepting applications for the Artadia Awards
2012 Chicago
 from all visual artists living and working in Cook County, IL. Individual artists and
collaboratives working in all media and at any point in their career are strongly encouraged to apply.
Awardees will be selected in the fall of 2012 through Artadia’s two-tiered jury process. This is Artadia’s
sixth awards cycle in Chicago.

Application deadline: August 20, 2012 at 11:59pm (CST).

Artadia will be hosting special programs in partnership with EXPO CHICAGO.

For eligibility requirements and to access the Web-based application, please visit
www.artadia.org

Artadia’s mission is to encourage innovative practice and meaningful dialogue across the
United States by providing visual artists in specific communities with unrestricted awards
and a national network of support. Founded in 1997, Artadia is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit
organization. Artadia Awards are determined through a jury process that employs nationally
prominent curators, artists, and arts professionals. Since its founding, Artadia has awarded
over $2 million to more than 225 artists in Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Houston, and the San
Francisco Bay Area. In 2009, Artadia launched a New York residency program for Artadia
Awardees at the International Studio and Curatorial Program (ISCP), Brooklyn. Most recently,
Artadia inaugurated a national publications and Exhibitions Exchange program offering
Awardees crucial exposure on a national level.


Lead funding for the Chicago Artadia Awards is generously provided by Larry and Marilyn Fields.
Additional support provided by Sally and Jon Kovler, Artadia’s National Council members Barbara
Fosco, Jack and Sandra Guthman, and Anne Van Wart and Mike Keable; as well donations by Karen
and Steve Berkowitz, Eszter Borvendeg and Mark Wight, Curt Conklin, Dirk Denison, Brian Herbstritt,
Gael Neeson and Stefan Edlis, Pamela and Art Sanders, and Linda Warren. 




Episode 361: Steve Reinke

July 30, 2012 · Print This Article

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This week: Artist and educator Steve Reinke.

Steve Reinke is an artist and writer best known for his single channel videos, which have been screened, exhibited and collected worldwide. He received his undergraduate education at the University of Guelph and York University, as well as a Master of Fine Arts from NSCAD University. The Hundred Videos — Mr. Reinke’s work as a young artist — was completed in 1996, several years ahead of schedule. Since then he has completed many short single channel works and has had several solo exhibitions/screenings, in various venues such as the Museum of Modern Art (New York), the National Gallery of Canada (Ottawa), The Power Plant (Toronto), the Art Gallery of Ontario (Toronto), the International Film Festival Rotterdam and the Argos Festival (Brussels), Barcelona Museum of Contemporary Art, and the Tate (London).

His tapes typically have diaristic or collage formats, and his autobiographical voice-overs share his desires and pop culture appraisals with endearing wit. His fertile brain and restless energy have led to a prolific output: Reinke’s ambitious project The Hundred Videos (1989-1996), which runs about five hours, appeared first in a VHS video-cassette compilation, then was released as a triple DVD set by Art Metropole in Toronto in 2007. His double DVD set My Rectum is not a Grave (Notes to a Film Industry in Crisis), also from Art Metropole, 2007, includes fourteen titles dating from 1997 to 2006.

Mr. Reinke’s video work is an extension of literature, focusing on the voice and performance. His video essays often feature first-person monologues in an ironic/satiric mode. Where earlier work was often concerned with an interrogation of desire and subjectivity, more recent work, collected under the umbrella of Final Thoughts, concerns the limits of things: discourse, experience, events, thought. His single channel work is distributed in Canada by Vtape and he is represented by Birch Libralato Gallery in Toronto.

He is currently associate professor of Art Theory & Practice at Northwestern University. In the 1990’s he produced a book of his scripts, Everybody Loves Nothing: Scripts 1997 – 2005, which was published by Coach House (Toronto). He has also co-edited several books, including By the Skin of Their Tongues: Artist Video Scripts (co-edited with Nelson Henricks, 1997), Lux: A Decade of Artists’ Film and Video (with Tom Taylor, 2000), and The Sharpest Point: Animation at the End of Cinema (with Chris Gehman, 2005).

In awarding the Bell Canada prize for Video Art to Steve Reinke, the assessment committee said: “Steve Reinke is one of the most influential artists currently working in video. With the first installments of The Hundred Videos in the early 1990’s he led a generation away from the studio into a new conceptual fiction. But Mr. Reinke’s contribution goes beyond his important tapes, he is a committed teacher and he has edited and co-edited several important media arts anthologies.”

Check out Steve’s websites:
www.myrectumisnotagrave.com
www.fennelplunger.com




Die Hard with Action/Spectacle Cinema

July 27, 2012 · Print This Article

I was late to the Action movie genre. Really late. In fact maybe all of the 90s was wasted on me. It was only a few years ago during a particularly stressful time that my partner said, You know what you need? A good action movie. Then we proceeded to watch Die Hard (1988), Die Harder (1990), Die Hard with a Vengeance (1995), and Live Free or Die Hard (2005). And guess what? After weekend of watching John McClane vanquish bad guys, both foreign and domestic, I felt a lot better. I mean what did I have to worry about? I didn’t have to run barefoot through broken glass to save my wife and everyone in her office from terrorists—on Christmas Eve, no less. So when I saw Action/Spectacle Cinema by Jose Arroyo on the “new” shelf at the library, I snapped it right up.

Action/Spectacle Cinema: A Sight and Sound Reader, is a collection of writings from The British Film Institute’s Sight and Sound, a smart and not too academic magazine. Instead of being organized chronologically, Arroyo divided the book into thematic sections: Big, Loud Action Movie; A John Woo Interlude; Comics, TV, SFX, and ‘the Ride” at the Movies; Indie Pulp and Neo-noir; Serial Killer in ’90s Hollywood; Critical Perspectives on a Mode; and Action/Spectacle in Review. But my favorite section is Arnold Schwarzenegger as Spectacle in Action.

This section, as you can imagine takes, Schwarzenegger as its subject, or if not the subject, then the vehicle by which the authors discuss their ideas. J. Hoberman’s essay “Nietzsche’s Boy” examines the trajectory of Arnold’s career and the shift from total bloody body count to that of benevolent action savior. This is best demonstrated by the difference between The Terminator and Terminator 2. The thing that struck me so much about these essays were that they were written in the ’90s, at a time when Schwarzenegger’s career as a politician was just beginning. This chapter foreshadows the man we would see as governor of California . This section, like the others, ends with reviews.

Although the essays are for the most part excellent, the real meat is in the reviews. Let’s be honest. Action movies are meant to entertain. There’s a car/train/plane chase. Shit blows up. The good guy wins. He gets the girl. I never thought much past that, and if I do read a review for an action movie, it’s only to see if it’s worth my $10.50. Action/Spectacle Cinema contains dozens of reviews and it was great fun to read them and see these films through a new, much more critical and loving lens than that which I am used to viewing action movies. Reading these sometimes twenty year-old reviews reminded me of films I’d completely forgotten about and loved, like The Long Kiss Goodnight. I also learned a lot about my viewing habits. As someone who somehow missed both Avatar and Titanic, I was surprised to find I am a James Cameron fan. Who knew?

Action/Spectacle Cinema is a good time. It’s not the kind of book most people would read cover-to-cover, nor is it must have for every library. Despite being on the library’s “new” shelf, it turns out that Action/Spectacle Cinema is not so new—it was published in 2000. But because this is an anthology of  ’90s film writing, it doesn’t feel dated, but instead like a snapshot of an exciting time in action film history.

 




Top 5 Weekend Picks! (7/27-7/29)

July 27, 2012 · Print This Article

1. Sports Infiltrated at Design Cloud

Work by Jake Myers, Sarah Belknap and Joseph Belknap.

Design Cloud is located at 118 N. Peoria. Reception Friday, 6-10pm.

2. Texploitation: Art, Guns, Girls, and BBQ at Antena

Work by Cirkit of Mythos, Ryder Richards, Eddy Rawlinson, Omar Hernandez, and Steve Cruz.

Antena is located at 1755 S. Laflin St. Reception Friday, 6-10pm.

3. Rocks on rocks on rocks / make_space_copy.jpg at The Plaines Project

Work by Allison Wade, Benjamin Evans, Billy Buck, Brandon Wilson, Christopher Meerdo, Emily Kozik, Emily Souers, Erin O’Keefe, Erin Washington, Etta Sandry, Gaia Nardie Warner, Hans Nostdahl, Ian Addison Hall, Jason Judd, JC Steinbrunner, Jessica Bell, Kate Bieschke, Kathy Cho, Kayla Mattes, Kelly Lynn Jones, Kelly Parsell, Kjell Varvin, Kristi O’Meara, Liz McCarthy, Magalie Guerin, Malin, Gabriella Nordin, Mia Christopher, Sherwin Tibayan, Trevor Powers, and Victoria Martinez.

The Plaines Project is located at 1822 S Desplaines St. Reception Friday, 7-10pm.

4. ELECTRODES at DEFIBRILLATOR

Work by Aaron Henderson.

DEFIBRILLATOR is located at 1136 N Milwaukee Ave. Reception Friday, 8-11:30pm.

5. YO SOLO at COLLABORACTION

Work by Alberto Aguilar, Paola Cabal, Maria Gaspar, Jorge Lucero and Josue Pellot.

COLLABORACTION is located at 1579 N. Milwaukee Ave. #336. Reception Friday, 6-9pm.




Endless Opportunities (Or Something)

July 26, 2012 · Print This Article

Curatorial practice is in the air this week. Word came from the awesome people over at HATCH Projects as part of the Chicago Artists Coalition that applications are up for both the curatorial and artists residencies. Elsewhere in the world of curatorial-ness, something is going down in Paris, and Frieze wants someone badass to hire.

Reminder: PROPELLERFUND-AUGUSTFIRST-HURRRRRRRRY

_______
Chicago:

Hatch Projects curatorial residency application: August 15th
Hatch Projects artists residency application: October 1st

HATCH Projects (2012-2013) is a yearlong, juried incubator for contemporary Chicago artists and curators that strives to support an ecology of curatorial and artistic practice. A pioneering initiative of CAC, HATCH Projects fosters shared experimentation, exchange and creativity to produce ground-breaking exhibitions and programs.

The Curatorial Residency is a new component of the program, designed by an Advisory Committee of local curators, artists and arts administrators who identified a need for professional development opportunities for emerging curators.

Artist Residents are divided into groups of six to work with one Curator Resident throughout the year. Selected artists will participate in two exhibitions curated by the group’s assigned Curator Resident. Each Artist Resident receives professional development through dynamic exhibitions, one-on-one studio visits, public programs, and community building to develop a sustainable creative practice.

Mentor Curators will provide experienced mentorship to selected Curator Residents throughout the year: Romi Crawford, (Ph.D.) Associate Professor, Visual Critical Studies and Liberal Arts and Graduate Director, Visual Critical Studies, School of the Art Institute of Chicago; Lisa Dorin (Associate Curator of Contemporary Art, Art Institute of Chicago); Sarah Herda (Executive Director, Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts); and Lisa Yun
Lee (Director, Jane Addams Hull-House Museum). Tricia Van Eck (founder and Director, 6018 North) will act as the HATCH Projects Advisor.

High five woman curator power.
chicagoartistscoalition.org/hatchprojects/ for HATCH Projects application guidelines.

____
Elsewhere:

Young Curators program, Palais de Tokyo, Paris, EU
Deadline September 30th
(hell yes: no application fee, must be under 40)

Dedicated to the emergence of the newest forms of contemporary art as it is, the Palais de Tokyo sees participating in the renewal of the ecosystem of art as part of its remit. This is why it undertakes to seek out and support new players, and new directions.
Thus in the summer of 2013 the Palais de Tokyo is entrusting its entire program schedule to young curators. Selected on the basis of the proposals they submit, the winners will bear witness to the perpetual reinvention of the issues involved in curating an exhibition, their scouting talent, and their ability to dream up new ways of relating to art. This event is likewise intended to demonstrate the dynamism of Paris and the surrounding area as part of a joint initiative involving a great many partners and institutions.

for more info on file sizing, etc:
youngcurators@palaisdetokyo.com
http://www.palaisdetokyo.com/

Curator, Frieze Foundation
London, UK

Frieze Foundation is seeking an experienced curator to devise the programme of special commissions at Frieze London, including: Frieze Projects, Frieze Film, and the selection and production of the Emdash award. The curator will have sole responsibility to deliver a high-profile and innovative art programme at the London fair.

Application: 
To apply for this position please send a CV and covering letter to hr@frieze.com with ‘Curator, Frieze Foundation’ in the subject line.

http://www.frieze.com/vacancies/#91486