Episode 270: Tammy Rae Carland

October 31, 2010 · Print This Article

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Tammy Rae Carland
This week: The kick off of a series of programs recorded at Baer Ridgway Exhibitions in San Francisco during BAS’s mini residency as a guest of Chris Duncan during his “Eye Against I” exhibition. Brian and Duncan talk with Chris about the series, and then the main event Tammy Rae Carland! In addition to being a fascinating guest, Tammy is the only guest we’ve had who has a song written about them to utilize as their intro/outro clip (by the awesome band Bikini Kill no less).

Bio lifted from Tammy’s site:

Tammy Rae Carland was born in Portland Maine in 1965. She received her MFA from UC Irvine, her BA from The Evergreen State College in Olympia Washington and attended the Whitney Independent Study Program. She is an Associate Professor at the California College of the Arts where she also Chairs the Photography Program. She is represented by Silverman Gallery in San Francisco and primarily works with photography, experimental video and small run publications. Her work has been screened and exhibited in galleries and museums internationally including New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Berlin and Sydney. Her photographs have been published in numerous books including The Passionate Camera; Queer Bodies of Desire and Lesbian Art in America.

Her fanzine writing has been republished in A Girl’s Guide to Taking Over the World. She has also published photographs and received reviews of her work in numerous national media including: The New York Times, Big, The Los Angeles Times, Spin, Details, Out and The Village Voice. In the 1990’s Carland independently produced a series of influential fanzines, including I (heart) Amy Carter. She has collaborated on the record art of some seminal underground music releases for the bands Bikini Kill, The Fakes and The Butchies. From 1997-2005 she co-ran Mr. Lady Records and Videos, an independent record label and video art distribution company that was dedicated to the production and distribution of queer and feminist culture. Tammy Rae Carland lives in Oakland California.

PS: A hearty “Fuck You” to Libsyn and their crappy software. This is the third time I’ve written this. Turn off or down the “time out” function on your site, jerks.




As Deep Throat once said: Follow the Money

October 29, 2010 · Print This Article

Capitalism

Capitalism, 2009, 4 video loops, 1'19'' by Istvan Laszlo

Versailles art show hit by injunction bid
From the wet dreams of the marketing people behind Japanese pop artist Takashi Murakami’s show at Versailles a descendant of the man who built the Versailles Palace in France is seeking an injunction to prevent modern works by Japanese pop artist Takashi Murakami from being shown there. The legal battle is fronted by Sixte Henri de Bourbon-Parme in defence of “respecting the chateau and ancestors.” The ultra-conservative royalist has united with a group, the Versailles Defence Coordination, to file the suit, in which they stake a claim for the “right to access to heritage.” Read more here

Prince Charles offers to oversee London architectural planning
This week in “What could possibly go wrong?” Prince Charles offers to take on key architectural planning role in the vaccum created by the quasi-autonomous non-governmental organisation that had its funding axed in the comprehensive spending review. The offer, announced by the foundation’s chief executive, Hank Dittmar, has been met with dismay by leading modernist architects who fear Prince Charles may use the role to advance his own traditional tastes in design. Read more here

Studio Manager Anne McIlleron talks about her boss William Kentridge
William Kentridge who is the focus of Art:21’s first feature length documentary (recently reviewed here and just broadcast on PBS this week) let his Studio Manager Anne McIlleron speak on what looks to be B-roll of the Art:21 documentary, its interesting but I am still of the opinion that William Kentridge wasn’t the best subject in the world to get this kind of treatment, just me I am sure. See more here

Kronos Quartet Interviewed
I cant get enough of Art Babble I admit and  double so for the Kronos Quartet (which Duncan & I caught in concert last time they were in Chicago and were amazing) so when you merge the two together it’s PB&J perfection. See More Here

Chagall’s America Stained-Glass Windows are Back on View in Chicago
What more do you need to say then that, everyone just needs to bring their significant other and get to kissing. Read more here

New Yorker cartoonist Leo Cullum died
Leo Cullum, whose cartoons kept readers of The New Yorker laughing for 33 years, has died. He was 68. Read more here

The art world’s own Bernie Madoff
Lawrence Salander Read more here

Google DemoSlam is previewed
Google has previewed a new site called demoslam built to encourage the creation and rank the best tech demonstrations on the net, part of me has long thought this was something the art world should have created a long time ago, free idea (hey get what you pay for) to whoever has the time and wants to put the work into it, Youtube was built for the Art world and a project like this (even though we all wish it looked like Vimeo). Have at it and God bless at this point I just want a life for a while lol. Read more here




Top 5 Weekend Picks! (10/29-10/30)

October 28, 2010 · Print This Article

Hello again my friends. Sorry for the lateness. First off, one more round of shameless self promotion, and I promise this will be the last one for a while. This Saturday night, for one night only, Flesh and Bone, a exhibition curated by myself, Jeriah Hildwine, and Annie Heckman, will be up at Co-Prosperity Sphere and HPAC. We’ve brought together 24 amazing artists, and are presenting their macabre works for this exhibition. If you’re anywhere on the south side, or can get there, please stop by, you won’t be disappointed. You can hit HPAC any time between 1pm and 10pm. Co-Prosperity’s reception is from 7pm-9pm, after 9pm there is a cover, and bands will be playing. Ok, enough about that, on to the Top 5!

1. Finished at Linda Warren

Work by Zach Taylor and Aaron Williams.

Linda Warren Gallery is located at 1052 W. Fulton Mkt. Reception is Friday from 6-9pm.

2. Hamish Fulton at Rhona Hoffman Gallery

Text based work at one of Chi-town’s blue chippers.

Rhona Hoffman Gallery is located at 118 N. Peoria St. Reception is Friday from 5:30-7pm.

3. It’s Your Funeral at Tattoo Factory Gallery -

Halloween horror art from the place that brought you The Unicorn Show.

Tattoo Factory Gallery is located at 4443 N. Broadway. Reception is Friday from 6-11pm.

4. Dirty Eyes at The Hills Esthetic Center -

No show image available, so I just picked something appropriate. And I quote, “Reuben Kincaid and The Hills Esthetic Center present an exhibition from the French Print House Le Dernier Cri.”

The Hills Esthetic Center is located at 128 N. Campbell Ave., Unit G. Reception is Friday from 8-11pm.

5. The Albatross at Swimming Pool Project Space

Work by David Harper.

Swimming Pool Project Space is located at 2858 W. Montrose Ave. Reception is Saturday from 5-9pm.




UPDATE: Hamish Fulton walks with you and Bernard Williams gets re-instated

October 27, 2010 · Print This Article


Two things are happening that you need to be aware of and that should not be missed.

First thing first…

On Thursday, October 28, at 12 pm, Hamish Fulton will conduct an artist walk in Chicago. Open to any and all individuals interested in participating, this walk will illuminate the importance of a local community’s involvement in Fulton’s artistic practice as a walking artist. We ask interested participants to meet at Jackson & Michigan Avenue in the Loop by the bust of Sir George Solti (located exactly East of S. Michigan Avenue, south of E. Jackson Drive, near the Art Institute of Chicago). The walk will last approximately one hour and fifteen minutes. Those who arrive after noon are welcome to observe the walk in progress but will not be able to participate. We also recommend that participants bring a watch or a mobile phone which has a timer.

Update from Rhona Hoffman Gallery…

Hamish Fulton Artist Walk in Chicago

****PLEASE NOTE NEW MEETING LOCATION!!****

Today, October 28, at 12 pm, Hamish Fulton will conduct an artist walk in Chicago. Open to any and all individuals interested in participating, this walk will illuminate the importance of a local community’s involvement in Fulton’s artistic practice as a walking artist. We ask interested participants to meet at the NEW location: Jackson & Michigan Avenue in the Loop by the bust of Sir George Solti (located exactly East of S. Michigan Avenue, south of E. Jackson Drive, near the Art Institute of Chicago). The walk will last approximately one hour and fifteen minutes. Those who arrive after Noon are welcome to observe the walk in progress but will not be able to participate. We also recommend that participants bring a watch or a mobile phone which has a timer.

The rumor is that it is to be an unusual, amazing, and atypical walk. I for one will be there.

Second…

Bernard Williams could use your votes. By now you all know that Williams is back into the Art Loop Open (for more information check out Abraham’s post) but he has lost a few voting days and will surly be at a disadvantage. We at Bad at Sports are totally biased towards our own Steve Hamann but Williams also could use some voting love. If he is your guy get on it, if not, go STEVE!




Center Field on art:21 blog: Interview with Derek Chan

October 26, 2010 · Print This Article

Our latest post for our Center Field column on art:21 blog is up! This week, Martine Syms talks to Derek Chan, whose 12 x 12 exhibition at the  Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago opens on November 6th. A brief excerpt:

Derek Chan and I have been friends for a little over four years. We both moved from Los Angeles to Chicago in the Fall of 2005. We had several mutual friends and emailed back and forth a few times but never met up. I spent that summer in Los Angeles and unknowingly started talking to Derek at a party. Inevitably, our conversation turned to Chicago and I laughed when I realized that this was the guy I’d had so much trouble making time for. Since then we’ve stayed close, meeting often to check in with each other, share food, and hang out.

One of Derek’s large abstract landscapes, Eclipse, was stored at my house for a year. I was happy to look at it every day. While works like Eclipse captured autobiographical moments with grand gestures, Derek has since focused his attention on the quotidian. During his residency at Theaster Gates’ Dorchester Project in South Chicago, Derek began making daily ink drawings to document his thoughts and share them with his fellow residents. All 260 images are available for download on Derek’s website. As part of the Whitney Biennial, Derek presented Being/Becoming, a durational performance that included ink drawings and temporary interventions to the Whitney’s courtyard. Derek developed a system of marks, influenced by Tibetan rituals, to record the passage of time and his interactions with museum visitors.

Derek Chan, “Being/Becoming” at the Whitney Biennial, 2010. Courtesy the artist.

Cries and Whispers from the Salt Song Trail is a continuation of this practice. This forthcoming book chronicles his recent journey to the Four Corners region of Arizona through drawings and writings about the sacred places he visited. Golden Age, the project space I run in Chicago, is publishing Cries and Whispers in conjunction with Derek’s upcoming exhibition Derek Chan: A Way of Life at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago (November 6 – 28, 2010). Continue reading.