Top 5 Weekend Picks! (5/28-5/30)

May 27, 2010 · Print This Article

Sorry for the missed week, I was rocking out in the lovely and exhausting Yosemite, climbing waterfalls, almost falling to my death (I shit you not, and it was completely my fault), looking at Pileated Woodpeckers (the Woody Woodpecker ones), drinking lots of Tecate and burning lots and lots of firewood. But now I’m back. It’s getting into that summer session, where things get lean. But as always quantity does not indicate quality, and following that, I give you my weekend picks. Mmmm, tasty!

1. Open Crit at Hyde Park Art Center

Wanna take part in an art critique? Here’s your chance. Artists presenting work: Tom Burtonwood, Takeshi Moro, and Cameron Harvey.

Hyde Park Art Center is located at 5020 S Cornell Ave. Crit Friday, from 6-8pm.

2. 30 Days of Dinner Time at Art on Armitage

Your last opportunity to see this month long event created by artist Kimmy Noonen.

Art on Armitage is located at 4125 W. Armitage Ave. Closing reception Friday, from 6-9pm.

3. LÃœX at Lloyd Dobler Gallery

How long has it been since you visited Lloyd Dobler Gallery? It’s been a while for me, so I’m heading back to one of the first galleries I visited in Chicago, and still one of my favorites.Solo show of Sebastian Vallejo.

Lloyd Dobler Gallery is located at 1545 W Division St, 2nd Fl. Reception Friday, from 6-10pm.

4. Me at Monument 2 Gallery

Different from what I’m used to at M2, and looks good. Just be sure to get there early, that place gets fucking packed! Work by Tim Louis Graham and Diego Leclery.

Monument 2 Gallery is located at 2007 N. Point St. Reception Saturday, from 6-10pm.

5. The Pentagon Saves The World at Pentagon

I’d make a joke about the title if it weren’t already such a depressing fucking joke. Bound to be some good work though. Work by Deborah Stratman, Jim Zimpel, Jesse Avina, Daniel Baird, Jake Myers and the Pentagon Education Collective.

Pentagon is located at 961 W 19th St., 1F. Reception Saturday, from 7-11pm.




Jerry Saltz Interviewed in Time Out Chicago about Upcoming Reality TV Show “Work of Art”

May 26, 2010 · Print This Article

Jerry Saltz is interviewed in Time Out Chicago this week about his role in the much-anticipated (among reality t.v. fans and art snarks like me, anyway) new television show Work of Art. I never knew Saltz was from Chicago! Nor did I realize he was an adjunct faculty member of the School of the Art Institute, either. Check out the full interview here; a brief excerpt follows.

Why’d you want to be a judge on Work of Art?
It isn’t for the money. I won’t tell you what I make, but it’s really not much. I wanted to perform criticism in public to show that it’s not an elitist practice but specialist and subjective—and more thrilling than people imagine.

So you think the show will help make visual art more accessible?
I do. People are frightened of looking at and making judgments about art, and they don’t need to be. They just need to look longer, see harder, listen to themselves, and they’ll hear voices they didn’t know they had in their heads, voices of real discernment.

It helps that, unlike with Top Chef, viewers experience the products themselves, so they form their own opinions as the judges form theirs.
Yes. I think the act of making art is not inherently sexy to most people. With food, that’s implied penetration and sexual. Sometimes watching somebody saw a piece of wood—not so interesting. To me, however, it’s metaphysically sensual—watching somebody try to imbed thought in material.

More than any other art form, visual art seems off-putting to people.
Yeah.

Why do you think that is?
We are not sure as a culture what art is to us. So when people are presented with stuff that is called art, nobody knows what to do with it. And that’s sad to me because people make visual judgments every single day: what color are you wearing, what material is it.

Has the art world itself contributed to that sense of inaccessibility?
It takes a lifetime sometimes to understand why an all-white painting is art. It’s hard for me sometimes to remember, to relive why a bicycle wheel mounted upside down on a stool is art.




Art HK 10 Fair Tries to Claim Title Of Reigning Art Fair In Asia

May 26, 2010 · Print This Article

2006 Pandas Chair by Humberto and Fernando Campana

Alexandra Seno takes a good look at the coming third year of Magnus Renfrew’s Art Hong Kong (art HK 10) which opens this week (May 27 to 30) and tries to push the idea that Hong Kong not Singapore & it’s Art Singapore sets the beat for Art Culture in Asia by showcasing 150 from 29 countries (out of allegedly 300 applications).

With artists that include Filmmaker Baz Luhrmann, British sculptor and Turner Prize winner Antony Gormley, Guggenheim Museum curator Alexandra Munroe, Japanese contemporary artist Takashi Murakami and Tokyo Museum of Contemporary Art curator Yuko Hasegawa.

Atendance is expected to be high considering there was a 30% jump last year to 28,000 visitors. Still small by international standards London’s Frieze Art Fair for instance, draws over 50,000 visitors but a interesting fair to keep an eye out for. More can be read here

In Mini News: The Museum of London reopens it’s modern galleries after a £20.5m refurbishment




Second Round of Layoffs at Art Institute

May 26, 2010 · Print This Article

There’s been a second round of layoffs at the Art Institute of about 65 employees, the Chicago Tribune reported yesterday. The first round of layoffs occurred approximately one year ago, when 22 employees lost their jobs. According to the Tribune, of the 65 layoffs, 50 are security managers.

That the majority of cuts are in the area of security shouldn’t come as a surprise, given that in March the Art Institute cut some of its gallery hours, closing some galleries for one to two hours a day in an effort to cut costs. At the time these “rotating closures” were described as an experiment that could potentially save the Museum $150,000 annually if continued. The cuts in security last week are probably a signal that fewer open hours in some galleries, on a rotating basis, are here to stay.

The other 15 positions cut include staff from the museum education department, retail operations, and the facility/physical plant department.

The Trib says the latest round of layoffs are due to the Art Institute’s “massive budget deficit” resulting from endowment losses of the type that have also been experienced by major U.S. museums such as the Getty in Los Angeles and the Met in New York.




When It Doesn’t Make Money It’s Art, When It Does It’s Advertising?

May 25, 2010 · Print This Article

Separd Fairey Mural on Houston and Bowery via Bowery Boogie

Last month artist Shepard Fairey who is single handedly putting a team of lawyers children through college erected a mural at the Elizabeth Houston Associates construction barriers on the corner of East Houston Street and the Bowery. This happened to be in advance of Fairey’s Mayday exhibition at Deitch Projects and the City of New York has decided that the work is in fact an advertisement that violated zoning laws prohibiting advertising and that Elizabeth Houston did not have the permit to erect a structure in the area. The city has issued a stop work order on the building being constructed behind the barriers until this has been resolved.

It would be interesting to have someone up to speed with public art zoning laws in New York City hash out the fine differences between the two. A hearing is in the process of being set for the violation. If found guilty of violating zoning laws, Elizabeth Houston Associates will be issued a fine and ordered to remove the mural.