Conrad Bakker–he of the individually hand-carved and painted replicas of a year’s worth of Artforum, made available at the genuinely unbelievable low price of $72, the art magazine’s own subscription fee–has just launched another of his untitled eBay projects that plays with notions of originality and market value. Bakker’s Untitled Project: eBAY/DEPRESSION GLASS is a series of nine oil paintings on panel each measuring 7 x 9.5 inches and based on photographs of depression-era glassware placed for auction on eBay. (The paintings are on view right now as part of the University of Illinois’ art and design faculty exhibition at the Krannert Art Museum). Last Friday Bakker put the paintings themselves up for auction (they can be found in eBay’s Pottery & Glass > Glass > Glassware > Depression category) but this time, he’s donating the proceeds to the Eastern Illinois Foodbank. Bidding closes in exactly 4 days, 23 hours and 34 minutes (as of this writing) and thus far prices remain ridiculously low–the priciest (the green bowl pictured below) is still only at $274. Yes, I may well drive them up by posting this, but it’s for a food bank after all. Take a look at some of the works on the virtual block, and if your wallet allows get thee over there and ramp up the bidding.

 

Conrad Bakker, ""Hazel Atlas Royal Lace Cobalt Blue 3 Footed 10in Bowl"

Conrad Bakker, “”Hazel Atlas Royal Lace Cobalt Blue 3 Footed 10in Bowl”

Conrad Bakker, "Indiana Glass Company Red 3 Toe Crimped Bowl"

Conrad Bakker, “Indiana Glass Company Red 3 Toe Crimped Bowl”

Conrad Bakker, ""Anchor Hocking Depression Green SANDWICH 6 1/2" BOWL"

Conrad Bakker, “”Anchor Hocking Depression Green SANDWICH 6 1/2″ BOWL”

(Via Open Space via C-Monster).

Claudine Isé

Claudine Isé has worked in the field of contemporary art as a writer and curator for the past decade, and currently serves as the Editor of the Art21 Blog. Claudine regularly writes for Artforum.com and Chicago magazine, and has also worked as an art critic for the Los Angeles Times. Before moving to Chicago in 2008, she worked at the Wexner Center in Columbus, OH as associate curator of exhibitions, and at the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles as assistant curator of contemporary art, where she curated a number of Hammer Projects. She has Ph.D. in Film, Literature and Culture from the University of Southern California.