Episode 113: Tracy Marie Taylor/ Front Forty Press

October 28, 2007 · Print This Article

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.


download Tracy Marie Taylor

Duncan and Richard talk to Tracy Marie Taylor, artist and curator who curated the new show Bilingual, Art at the Intersection of Painting and Video.

Bilingual focuses on artwork at the intersection of painting and drawing, film and video, encompassing both conceptual and process-driven approaches. The artists in this exhibition are acting as visual linguists or interpreters, breaking down one language and reconstructing it in another, holding the sense of the structure together with an understanding of both.

Bilingual will feature works by Shira Avni, Kylie Baker, Wafaa Bilal, Jeremy Blake, Eddy De Vos, Terence Hannum, Jay Heikes, John Hiltabidel & John Grant, Jo Jackson, William Kentridge, Patte Loper, Joshua Mosley, Sabina Ott, David Reed, Peter Rostovsky, Alison Ruttan, Jason Salavon, Marcelino Stuhmer, Fraser Taylor, Jim Trainor, and Scott Wolniak.

Joanna and Terri talk to Doug Fogelson from Front Forty Press about art books and lots of other neat stuff. Front Forty Press is a small publisher focused on artistic projects. A Front Forty project is one that embodies uninhibited creativity and deals with current topics. The work can be functional, political, ecological or simply expressive. What matters most at Front Forty Press is the cultivation and communication of ideas.
Read more




How to write Australian Political Ads

October 27, 2007 · Print This Article




Episode 112: Trevor Paglen/ Pate Conaway

October 21, 2007 · Print This Article

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.


downloadTrevor Paglen

This week: Marc and Brian talk to Trevor Paglen.

“Trevor Paglen is an artist, writer, and experimental geographer working out of the Department of Geography at the University of California, Berkeley. His work involves deliberately blurring the lines between social science, contemporary art, and a host of even more obscure disciplines in order to construct unfamiliar, yet meticulously researched ways to interpret the world around us. His most recent projects involve close examinations of state secrecy, the California prison system, and the CIA’s practice of “extraordinary rendition.”

Paglen’s visual work has been shown in galleries and museums including MASSMOCA (2006), the Warhol Museum (2007), Diverse Works (2005), in journals and magazines from Wired to The New York Review of Books, and at numerous other arts venues, universities, conferences, and public spaces. He has had one-person shows at Deadtech (2001), the LAB (2005), and Bellwether Gallery (2006).

Paglen’s first book, Torture Taxi: On the Trail of the CIA’s Rendition Flights (co-authored with AC Thompson; Melville House, 2006) was the first book to systematically describe the CIA’s “extraordinary rendition” program. His second book, I Could Tell You But Then You Would Have to be Destroyed by Me (Melville House, 2007) an examination of the visual culture of “black” military programs, will be published in November 2007. He is currently completing his third book, entitled Blank Spots on a Map, which will be published by Dutton/NAL/Penguin in late 2008/early 2009.

Paglen has received grants and commissions from Rhizome.org, the LEF Foundation, and the Eyebeam Center for Art and Technology. In 2005, he was a Vectors Journal Fellow at the University of Southern California.

Paglen holds a BA from UC Berkeley, an MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and is currently completing a PhD in the Department of Geography at the University of California at Berkeley.”

NEXT: Terri and Serena talk to Pate Conaway.

“Pate Conaway is an interdisciplinary artist from Chicago, Illinois. Conaway sees the act of art-making as a performance in itself. Conaway has produced art in gallery situations, including during a five-week stint at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago where he knitted a pair of nine-foot-long mittens. The artist, whose background is in performance and paper arts, continues to work in sculpture, installation, and interactive performance. Now learning to sew, Conaway is fascinated by the idea of applying garment construction techniques to bookbinding. Pate Conaway is a graduate of Chicago’s Second City Training Center and received his MFA from Columbia College, Chicago. He has exhibited extensively in the mid-west and his work can be found in the Artist Book Collection at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago.”

Also Richard horribly mispronounces Mr. Conaway’s name and gives a profound apology from one Richard Wholand.

AND Mike B. has a rant to offer.
Read more




Miami Beach news report [or] why I am not going to Art Basel this year.

October 17, 2007 · Print This Article

More to come as it unfolds…..




Episode 111: Sympathy for Dominic Molon

October 14, 2007 · Print This Article

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.


downloadDominic smells like brimstone?
Duncan and Richard talk to Dominic Molon about, Sympathy for the Devil: Art and Rock and Roll Since 1967. There are lots of “Rock out with your cock out!” kind of stupid comments. Paul Klein and Wesley hated it, hear from the curator go check out the show and see what you think.

From the MCA site:

“Sympathy for the Devil: Art and Rock and Roll Since 1967 examines the dynamic relationship between rock music and contemporary visual art, a relationship that crosses continents, generations, and cultures. Since the late 1950s this unlikely hybrid of rhythm-and-blues and country music has had an undeniable impact on society while drastically changing with the times. Artists from the 1960s to the present have maintained a strong connection to rock, beginning with Andy Warhol’s involvement with The Velvet Underground (who released their Warhol-produced landmark album The Velvet Underground and Nico in 1967 — the same year the MCA opened its doors). More recently, artists such as Slater Bradley, Raymond Pettibon, and Mike Kelley have created album covers and music videos for rock bands, while many noted rock musicians such as John Lennon, Bryan Ferry, and Peter Townsend have emerged from art schools.

This exhibition is the most serious and comprehensive look at the intimate and inspired relationship between the visual arts and rock-and-roll culture to date, charting their intersection through works of art, album covers, music videos, and other materials. The exhibition addresses the importance of specific cities such as London, New York, Los Angeles, and Cologne; rock and roll’s style, celebrity, and identity politics in art; the experience, energy, and sense of devotion rock music inspires; and the dual role that many individuals play in both the sonic and visual realms. This exhibition is curated by MCA Curator Dominic Molon.”
Read more