Episode 74: Steve Lacy

January 28, 2007 · Print This Article

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

While you the Bad at Sports listener only get a taste of it, the interview portion of this week’s show demonstrates precisely why Richard needs to be present to be a jerk for these things or they devolve into chaos. Luckily our cut rate production staff pulled it together and it sounds something akin to coherent. This week Duncan, Amanda and Chris Walla, talk to, or at least try to talk to Steve Lacy, Anthony Elms and Philip von Zweck about Steve’s show at VONZWECK, Academy Records, and lots of other stuff..

ALSO

Emily Heath and Christian Kuras from Bad at Sports London check in.

AND

Mike Benedetto reviews Goundhog Day in time for Groundhog Day.

Also

The BAS video of the week: http://youtube.com/watch?v=pj66XgK3NvE

Read more




Episode 73: Terence Hannum

January 21, 2007 · Print This Article

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.


Duncan and David Michael Coyle interview Terence Hannum, artist, critic, musician and all around swell guy about his forthcoming show in the MCA’s 12 x 12 series Evocation”

.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.

Read more




Episode 72: Reviews with Velliquette

January 14, 2007 · Print This Article

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.


This week, The Bad at Sports Staff Meeting intro! Michael Velliquette joins Amanda and Duncan in review shows galore, heck maybe even yours. Don’t miss it.

We are doing a show from CAA, if you are interviewing, being interviewed, presenting, or just there for the non-stop action and fun, we are looking to get brief reviews of the experience from you! E-mail us and we will set up a meeting place at CAA to record.

Read more




Episode 71: van Straaten/ Hoke

January 7, 2007 · Print This Article

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Holy guacamole fun times! This week Kathryn Born interviews Natalie van Straaten. Mark Staff Brandl talks about Jeff Hoke’s kickass book-website-museum Museum of Lost Wonder. Mike Benedetto gives a DOUBLE FEATURE REVIEW. Lastly there is a special bonus treat at the end of this week’s show, it is a surprise.

Natalie van Straaten has been a professional writer on arts subjects for more than 30 years and founded Chicago Gallery News in 1983. A curator, educator, administrator and organizer, she serves on various arts advisory boards and is a frequent juror in art competitions. She served as Executive Director of the Chicago Coalition for Arts in Education (1983-1986), and co-directed an art gallery for fourteen years.

Shamelessly and apologetically lifted from Publishers Weekly

Starred Review. Every now and then, a book comes along that’s almost impossible to categorize, like Hoke’s beautifully illustrated gem, a strange marriage of alchemical lore and psychology, science and “wonder.” Hoke, an artist and a senior exhibition designer at California’s Monterey Bay Aquarium, writes that the eclectic museums and curiosity cabinets of the 1600s inspired him, and that he wants to return us to a time before “science became a belief system unto itself,” a time when artist-alchemist-scientists were able to search for inner truth via mystical experiences and experiments without being ridiculed. Guided by the Greek muses and lured by his lovely color illustrations, readers are beckoned into seven “exhibition halls,” named for the stages of alchemical transformation from base matter to divinely inspired knowledge. Each exhibit also includes a pull-out interactive paper model, such as a “Do-It-Yourself Model of the Universe” in chapter one, where Hoke playfully addresses various creation myths. The chapter on dream states, visions and hypnosis is particularly fascinating. This is a book to linger over; it gradually reveals itself as a sly philosophical meditation on human consciousness, bringing in concepts from Tibetan Buddhism and quantum physics.

Coming soon! Rodney Graham!!!
Read more